Lauren Tenney, PhD, MPhi, MPA, Psychiatric Survivor
Call Me @ (516) 319-4295 

www.LaurenTenney.us

(516) 319-4295

OurStory of Commitment: A Living Document


DISCLAIMER

Many people have been involved in the creation of what I am terming "Ourstory"  (Not his story, or her story, but Our Story).  A list of contributors follows.  This page is under construction and Ourstory is in the process of being fact-checked.  There are also about 20 pages of historical events to be added in.  The list grows quickly.  A special "Thank You" to all who are - and want - to be involved.  This time line of our often buried history has been fascinating to construct.  More to come.

 

Contributors: 

Peter Ashenden, George Badillo, Su Budd, Maggie Bennington-Davis, Gayle Bluebird, Celia Brown, Jacob Bucher, Angela Cerio, Oryx Cohen, Richard Cohen, Ted Chabasinski, Amy Coleante, Eva Dech, Mark Davis, Deb Damone, Doug DeVoe, Gloria Gervais, George Ebert, Mike Halligan, Daniel Hazen, Kevin Huckshorn, Vanessa Jackson, Daniel Fisher, Leonard Roy Frank, Larry Fricks, Ben Hansen, Daniel Hazen, Ellen Healion, Karen Henninger, Marry Maddock, John McCarthy, Richard McDonald, Traci Murry, David Oaks, Stephanie Orlando, Darby Penney, Pat Risser, Joseph Rogers, Susan Rogers, Ruth Ruth, Dally Sanchez, Judene Shelley, Y Z Smith, Lauren Spiro, Peggy Swarbrick, Lauren Tenney, Can Truong, Carlton Whitmore, Debbie Whittle, Sally Zinman, and You - (fill out the form above with a tidbit of knowledge!). 
Major Works Utilized: (footnotes to be added)

Gail Hornstein’s First Person Accounts of Madness, Third Edition; Judi Chamberlin’s works; Vanessa Jacksons’ works; Pat Risser’s time line; www.mindfreedom.org; http://www.aglp.org/gap/timeline.htm; http://www.menstuff.org/issues/byissue/mentalhealthtimeline.html; http://www.erowid.org/psychoactives/history/history_article2.shtml; wikipedia; and the world wide web. 

 

This time line was compiled in 2008.  It needs to be updated.  Please feel free to use the comment box (at the bottom of the page) for corrections and additions.

Thank You for Your time.  ~~10e


 

Ourstory of Commitment:

A living history.  

 

1620    Petition of the Poor Distracted People in the  House of Bedlam (concerned with conditions for inmates).
           
1739    The London-Citizen Exceedingly Injured; or, a British Inquisition Display’d, in an Account of the Unparallel’d Case of a Citizen of London, Bookseller to the Late Queen, Who Was in a Most Unjust and Arbitrary Manner Sent on the 23rd of March Last, 1738, by One Robert Wightman, a Mere Stranger, to a Private Madhouse. London: T. Cooper by Cruden, Alexander.   
       
1740    Mr. Cruden Greatly Injured: An Account of a Trial between Mr. Alexander Cruden, Bookseller to the Late Queen, Plaintif, and Dr. Monro, Matthew Wright, John Oswald, and John Davis, Defendants; in the Court of the Common-Pleas in Westminster Hall July 17, 1739, on an Action of Trespass, Assault and Imprisonment:  the Said Mr. Cruden, Tho’ in His Right Senses, Having Been Unjustly Confined and Barbarously Used in the Said Matthew Wright’s Private Madhouse at Bethnal-Green for Nine Weeks and Six Days, till He Made His Wonderful Escape May 31, 1738.  To Which is Added a Surprising Account of Several Other Persons, Who Have Been Mostly Unjustly Confined in Private Madhouses. London: A. Injured. Alexander Cruden       

1751    First mental hospital in the United States, Pennsylvania University Hospital where a basement was reserved for people identified as mentally ill.   

1754    The Adventures of Alexander the Corrector, Wherein Is Given an Account of His Being Unjustly Sent to Chelsea, and of His Bad Usage during the Time of his Chelsea Campaign . . . with an Account of the Chelsea-Academies, or the Private Places  for the Confinement of Such As Are Supposed to Be Deprived of the Exercise of Their Reason. by Alexander Cruden.   
       
1770    In the 1770s, the earliest recorded mutual self-help societies of individuals with alcohol abuse problems are created by Native Americans.   

1773    The first mental health hospital in U.S., named Eastern State Hospital, opens in Williamsburg, Virginia.   
   
1774    One More Proof of the Iniquitous Abuse of Private Madhouses. Samuel Bruckshaw.   
       
1774    The Case, Petition, and Address of Samuel Bruckshaw, who Suffered a Most Severe Imprisonment, for Very Near the Whole Year, Loaded with Irons, without Being Heard in his Defense, Nay Even without Being Accused, and at Last Denied an Appeal to a Jury.  Humbly Offered to the Perusal and Consideration of the Public.  Samuel Bruckshaw.   
       
1793    According to psychiatric legend, French psychologist Phillip Pinel strikes the chains from mental patients held in the Bastille in France. Philip Pinel (1745-1826), the leading French psychiatrist of his day, was the first to say that the "mentally deranged" were diseased rather than sinful or immoral. In 1793, he removed the chains and restraints from the inmates at the Bicetre asylum, and later from those at Salpetriere. Along with the English reformer William Turk, he originated the method of "moral management," using gentle treatment and patience rather than physical abuse and chains on hospital patients.   

1796    Address to Humanity, Containing a Letter to Dr. Thomas Monro; a Receipt to Make a Lunatic, and Seize his Estate and a Sketch of a True Smiling Hyena. William Belcher   
       
1801    The Strange Effects of Faith with Remarkable Prophecies.  Joanna Southcott   
   
1810    Madness: Exhibiting a Singular Case of Insanity, and a No Less Remarkable Difference  in Medical Opinion: Developing the Nature of Assailment, and the Manner of Working Events; with a Description of the Torture Experienced by Bomb-Bursting, Lobster-Cracking, and Lengthening the Brain. John Halsam (ed.)   

1811    A Letter to Dr. R. D. Willis: to Which are Added, Copies of Three Other Letters: Published in the Hope of Rousing a Humane Nation to the Consideration of the Miseries Arising from Private Madhouses: with a Preliminary Address to Lord Erskine. Anne Mary Crowe.   
       
1813    The Second Book of Wonders. Joanna Southcott.

1816    Early Life of William Cowper. by Wiliam Cowper.   

1818    Bethlehem Hospital. by Urbane Metcalf.   

1823    Fiction or the Memories of Francis Barnett. 2 vols. by Francis Barnett.   
       
1825    A Description of the Crimes and Horrors in the Interior of Warburton's Private Mad-House at Hoxton, Commonly Called Whibmore House. by John Mitford.
   
1825    Part Second of the Crimes and Horrors of the Interior of Warburton's Private Mad-Houses at Hoxton and Bethnal Green and of These Establishments in General with Reasons for Their Total Abolition. by John Mitford.   

1827    Observations on the Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Derangement. Founded on an Extensive Moral and Medical Practice in the Treatment of Lunatics. Together With the Particulars of the Sensations and Ideas of a Gentleman During Mental Alternation, Written by Himself During His Confinement.  by Paul Slade Knight.   

   
1830    Narrative of the Treatment Experienced by John Tempest, Esq., of Lincoln's Inn, Barrister at Law during Fourteen Months Solitary Confinement under a False Imputation of Lunacy. by John Tempest   
   
1833    An Account of the Imprisonment and Sufferings of Robert Fuller, of Cambridge. Boston: The Author.    Fuller, Robert.   
   
1838    A Narrative of the Treatment Experienced by a Gentleman, During a State of Mental Derangement; Designed to Explain the Causes and the Nature of Insanity, and to Expose the Injudicious Conduct Pursued Towards Many Unfortunate Sufferers Under That Calamity. 2 vols. by John Percavel 1838 and 1840 (republished, with an introduction by Gregory Bateson, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1961).   
       
1838    Scenes in a Mad House. Boston: Samuel N. Dickinson. Derby, John Barton.

1840    In the 1840s, the Washingtonians, an organization with the central tenant that 'social camaraderie was sufficient to sustain sobriety,' enlist recovering alcoholics as missionaries to individuals with drinking disorders, thus pioneering the notion of service as a tool of self-help.   
       
1840    First U.S. attempt to measure the extent of mental illness occurs with the U.S. Census of 1840.   
       
1841    The Madhouse System. Richard Paternoster.   

1841    Dorothea Dix begins her work on behalf of people with disabilities incarcerated in jails and poorhouses.    
   
1842    “Scene in a Private Mad-House.” Asylum Journal. 1(1): 1. Anonymous.

1843    Remarks by Elizabeth T. Stone, upon the Statements Made by H.B. Skinner, in the Pulpit of the Hamilton Chapel, on Sunday Afternoon, 18th of June 1843, in Reference to What She Had Stated Concerning His Being Chaplain in the Charlestown McLean Asylum:  and Also a Further Relation on Her Suffering While Confined in That Place for 16 months and 20 days.  Boston: The Author. Stone, Elizabeth.   

1844    Founding of the American Psychiatric Association (APA). At a meeting in 1844 in Philadelphia, 13 superintendents and organizers of insane asylums and hospitals formed the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane (AMSAII).   
       
1845    Alleged Lunatics Friends Society, seen as  the forerunner of present day advocacy groups.  This groups lasted until 1863.    


1846    The Lily of the West: On Human Nature, Education, the Mind, Insanity, with Ten Letters as a Sequel to the Alphabet; the Conquest of Man, Early Days; a Farewell to My Native Home, the Song of the Chieftain's Daughter, Tree of Liberty, and the Beauties of Nature and Art, by G. Grimes, an Inmate of the Lunatic Asylum of Tennessee. Nashville. Grimes, Green.   
   
1846    A Secret Worth Knowing: A Treatise on the Most Important Secret in the World: Simply to say, Insanity, by G. Grimes, an Inmate of the Lunatic Asylum of Tennessee. Nashville: Nashville Union    Grimes, Green.
   
1847    A Secret Worth Knowing: A Treatise on Insanity, the Only Work of the Kind in the United States or, Perhaps in the Known World: Founded on General Observation and Truth, by G. Grimes, an Inmate of the Lunatic Asylum of Tennessee. New York: W. H. Graham.    Grimes, Green.   
       
1847    Thirty-Two Years of the Life of an Adventurer.  New York: The Author. Drake, John H.   
       
1848    “Illustrations of Insanity Furnished by the Letters and Writings of the Insane.” American Journal of Insanity.  4: 290-308. Anonymous.   

1848    Samuel Gridley Howe told the Massachusetts legislature, "There are at least a thousand persons of this class who not only contribute nothing to the common stock, but who are ravenous consumers, who are idle and often mischievous, and who are dead weight upon the prosperity of the state."   

1849    Five Months in the New York State Lunatic Asylum, by an Inmate. Buffalo: L. Danforth. Anonymous.   
   
1849    Mr. Dyce Sombre's Refutation of the Charge of Lunacy Brought Against Him in the Court of Chancer. Paris.  by Dvee Sombre.    

1850    “The Ohio Lunatic Asylum.”  The Journal of Psychological Medicine and Mental Pathology.  3:  456-90.    Anonymous.   
   
1851    Autobiography of the Rev. William Walford. London. by William Walford.   

1851    The Opal Volume 1.  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.
   
1851    Dr.Samuel Cartwright,a prominent Louisiana physician and one of the leading authorities in his time on the medical care of Negroes,identi?ed two mental disorders peculiar to slaves.Drapetomia,or the disease causing Negroes to run away.   
       
1851    Dysaethesia Aethiopica was a mental illness described by Dr. Cartwright  which proposed a theory for the cause of laziness among slaves. Today, dysaethesia aethiopica is considered an example of  scientific racism.   

1851    Astounding Disclosures! Three Years in a Mad House, by a Victim. A True Account of the Barbarous, Inhuman and Cruel Treatment of Isaac H. Hunt, in the Maine Insane Hospital, in the Years 1844, '45, '46 and '47, by Drs. Isaac Ray, James Bates, and Their Assistants and Attendants. Skowhegan: The Author. Hunt, Isaac H.   

1852    “A Letter from a Patient.” The Opal – A monthly Periodical of the State Lunatic Asylum, Devoted to Usefulness.  2: 245-246.    Anonymous.
   
1852    The Opal Volume 2.  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.   
       
1852    Astounding Disclosures! Three Years in a Mad House, by a Victim. Contains Also: A Short Account of Miss Elizabeth T. Stone in the McLean Asylum at Somerville, Mass. and a Short Account of the Burning of the Maine Asylum, Dec. 4th, 1850. Skowhegan: The Author,.    Hunt, Isaac H.    1

1852    Startling Facts from the Census was published in the American Journal of Insanity.  It argued that slavery kept blacks well, because there was a higher incidence of insanity in Blacks in the North than the South.
   
1852    Insanity Among the Colored Population of the Free States.  By Dr. Jarvis.  Jarvis writes to "disabuse any readers mind" of the information released in "startling facts from the census".  Jarvis' investigation into the Census actually created what is now called the "modern census" as he found the statistics were largely unreliable.   

1853    Passages from the History of a Wasted Life. Boston: Benj. B. Mussey.Middle-Aged Man [pseud.].
   
1853    Invention of the hypodermic syringe, its use to inject morphine to reduce pain rapidly became widespread during the Civil War.   

1853    Dorothea Dix is credited for the creation of the first public mental hospital in Harrisburg Pennsylvania.   

1853    The Opal Volume 3.  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.   
   
1854    The Opal Volume 4.  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.   
       
1854    “A Chapter from Real Life. By a Recovered Patient.” The Opal – A monthly Periodical of the State Lunatic Asylum, Devoted to Usefulness. 4: 48-50. Anonymous.
1854    Letters of a Lunatic: A Brief Exposition of My University Life During the Years 1853-1854. New York: The Author. Adler, George J.   

1855    Scenes from the Life of a Sufferer: Being the Narrative of a Residence in Morningside Asylum. Edinburgh. by Anonymous   

1855    Two Years and Three Months in the New York Lunatic Asylum at Utica. Syracuse: Published by the Author. Davis, Phebe B.   

1855    Life in the Asylum.” The Opal – A monthly Periodical of the State Lunatic Asylum, Devoted to Usefulness. 5: 4-6.    Anonymous.   

1855    Letters to the People on Health and Happiness.  New York: Harper and Brothers. Beecher, Catherine.   
       
1855    St. Elizabeth’s Psychiatric Hospital established as first Federal mental health facility.   
   
1855    The Opal Volume 5.  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.   
       
1856    The Opal Volume 6 New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.
   
1857    The Opal Volume 7 New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients”, Utica State Lunatic Asylum.           

1858    Henry Knight cut the ribbon on the first institution for Undesirables in Connecticut stating, "Being consumers and not producers, they are a great pecuniary burden in the state."   
       
1858    The Opal Volume 8  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.   
       
1859    The Opal Volume 9  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum. Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.   
       
1860    Seven Months in the Kingston Lunatic Asylum, and What I Saw There. by Ann Pratt.   
       
1860    The travels and experiences of Miss Phebe B. Davis, of Barnard, Windsor County, VT, being a sequel to her two years and three months in the N.Y. state lunatic asylum at Utica, N.Y.  Davis, Phebe. B.   
   

1861    Susan B. Anthony & Elizabeth Cady Stanton - Could the dark secrets of those insane asylums be brought to light...we would be shocked to know the countless number of rebellious wives, sisters and daughters that are thus annually sacrificed to false customs and conventionalisms and barbarous laws made by men for women.   
       
1861.    The Opal Volume 10.  New York: Utica State Lunatic Asylum.  Edited by the “Patients,” Utica State Lunatic Asylum.    The journal is shut down in the fourth number.
       
1861    The American Godhead:  or, the Constitution of the United States Cast Down by Northern Slavery, or by the Power of Insane Hospitals.  Boston:  The Author. Stone, Elizabeth.   

1862    Statement of Mrs. Lydia B. Denny, Wife of Reuben S. Denny, of Boston, in Regard to Her Alleged Insanity.  n.p. Denny, Lydia B.   

1864    The Exposure on Board the Atlantic and Pacific Car of the Emancipation for the Slaves of Old Columbia . . . or, Christianity and Calvinism Compared, with an Appeal to the Government to Emancipate the Slaves of the Marriage of the Union.  Chicago: Author. Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.   

1864    The Monomaniac, or Shirley Hall Asylum. New York: James G. Gregory. Gilbert, William.   
   
1865    Two Years in a Lunatic Asylum. London.  by Mabel Etchell.   

1865    Great Disclosure of Spiritual Wickedness!! In High Places with an Appeal to the Government to Protect the Inalienable Rights of Married Women. Boston: Author. Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.   
       
1866    Marital Power Exemplified in Mrs. Packard's Trial and Self-Defense from the Charge of Insanity; or, Three Years Imprisonment for Religious Belief, by the Arbitrary Will of a Husband, with an Appeal to the Government to so Change the Laws as to Afford Legal Protection to Married Women. Hartford, CT: Case, Lockwood, Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.   
   
1867    Life in a Lunatic Asylum: An Autobiographical Sketch. London. by Anonymous.

1868    Mrs. Elizabeth Packard, (1816-1897) one of North America's first ex-insane asylum inmate activists, confined from 1860-63 in Illinois State Hospital for the Insane in Jacksonville, Illinois, published the first of several books and pamphlets in which she detailed her forced commitment by her husband in the Jacksonville (Illinois) insane Asylum. Elizabeth Packard was locked up in a state insane asylum in Illinois from 1860 - 1863 because she disagreed with some of her husband's religious views, had different ideas than he did about how to raise their children, and also because she opposed slavery while he was in favor of it. For daring to have such opinions, she spent three years confined as a madwoman.   
       
1868    “Mrs. Olsen’s Narrative of her One Year’s Imprisonment at Jacksonville Insane Asylum.”  Appended to The Prisoner’s Hidden Life or Insane Asylums Unveiled.  Elizabeth Packard.  Chicago: Author.  Olsen, Sophie.   

1868    Two years and four months in a lunatic asylum: From August 20th, 1863 to December 20th, 1865. Saratoga Springs, NY: Van Benthuysen and Sons.    Chase, Harim.   
   
1868    The Prisoner’s Hidden Life; or, Insane Asylums Unveiled. Chicago: Author. Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.   
   
1868    Elizabeth Packard founds the Anti-Insane Asylum Society based on her experience of commitment in an Illinois Asylum.  Her husband committed her because her religious beliefs were different than her.    1

1869    The Life and Travels of Benjamin S. Snider: His Persecution, Fifteen Times a Prisoner. Washington: The Author,. Snider, Benjamin S.   

1870    Narrative of a Pilgrim and Sojourner on Earth, from 1791 to the Present Year, 1870. by Louisa Perina Courtauld Clemens.   

1870    Lunatic Asylums: Their Use and Abuse. New York.  Titus, Mrs. Ann H.
   
1871    Behind Bars. Boston: Lee & Shepard. Lunt, Adeline T.P.   

1872    My Outlawry, A Tale of Madhouse Life. London.  by Louisa Lowe   

1872    Report of a Case Heard in Queen's Bench, November 22nd, 1872, Charging the Commissioners in Lunacy with Concurring in the Improper Detention of a Falsely-Alleged  Lunatic and Wrongfully Tampering with her Correspondence. London.  by Louisa Lowe.   
   
1872    How an Old Woman Obtained Passive Writing and the Outcome Thereof. London. by Louisa Lowe.   

1872    A Nineteenth Century Adaptation of Old Inventions to the Repression of New Thoughts and Personal Liberty. London. by Louisa Lowe.   

1872    Gagging in Madhouses as Practised by Government Servants in a Letter to the People, by one of the Gagged. London. by Louisa Lowe.   

1872    Clitoridectomies performed in association with women’s mental disorders.        
1872    The Lunacy Laws and Trade in Lunacy in a Correspondence with the Earl of Shaftesbury. London. by Louisa Lowe.
       
1873    Modern Persecution; or Insane Asylums Unveiled.  Hartford: Author.    Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.
       
1874    The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) – the first national organization composed of community-based groups – was founded and focused on the problems that alcohol caused families and society.   

1874    Ten Years and Ten Months in Lunatic Asylums in Different States. Hoosick Falls: The Author,. Swan, Moses.
       
1875    The North Carolina General Assembly appropriated $10,000 to build a "colored insane asylum".   
       
1876    A Mad World and Its Inhabitants. New York:  Appleton.    Chambers, Julius.
       
1876    Lunatic Asylums: and How I Became an Inmate of One. Chicago: Ottaway and Colbert, Metcalf, Ada.   
   
1877    Am I a Lunatic? Or, Dr. Henry T. Helmbold's Exposure of his Personal Experience in the Lunatic Asylums of Europe and America. New York: Helmbold, Henry.
   
1878    The History of My Orphanage, or the Outpourings of an Alleged Lunatic. London. by Georgina Weldon.   

1878    The Mystic Key; or The Asylum Secret Unlocked.  Hartford: Author.    Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.   

1879    “A Sketch of Psychiatry in Southern States. ”Presidential Address, American Medico-Psychological Association. Baltimore. Powell, T. O.
           
1879    Behind the Scenes; Or, Life in an Insane Asylum. Chicago: Culver.    Smith, Lydia Adeline Jackson Button.   
       
1879    Behind the Scene; or, Life in an Insane Asylum. Chicago: Culver, Page, Hoyne and Co. Smith, Lydia.
       
1879    Wilhelm Wundt established the first formal psychological laboratory at the University of Leipzig in Germany where he introduced a scientific approach to psychology and performed many experiments to measure peoples' reaction time. This event is considered the birth of psychology.

1879    My Experience in a Lunatic Asylum, by a Sane Patient. London. by Chalres Herman Merivale   
1880    The Eastern Asylum for the Colored Insane was opened with accommodations for four hundred and twenty patients.   
   
1880    A Blighted Life: A True Story. (orig. pub. 1880; reprinted, Bristol: Thoemmes Press, 1996). by Bulwer Rosina Lytton.
   
1881    At the 40th anniversary of the Medico-Psychological Association at University College, Daniel Tuke, the president, paid respect to her 'who has a claim to the gratitude of mankind for having consecrated the best years of her life to the fearless advocacy of the cause of the insane'.            

1882    An Insight into an Insane Asylum. Louisville, KY: The Author. Camp, Joseph.    
1882    How I Escaped the Mad Doctors. London.  by Georgina Weldon.   

1883    The Memorial Scrapbook.  A Combination of Precedents.  Boston:     Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.   

1883    Sir Francis Galton in England coins the term eugenics, in his book Essays in Eugenics, to describe his pseudo-science of "improving the stock" of humanity. The eugenics movement, taken up by Americans, leads to passage in the United States of laws to prevent people with various disabilities from moving to this country, marrying, or having children. In many instances, it leads to the institutionalization and forced sterilization of people with disabilities or poor people, including children. Eugenics campaigns against people of color and immigrants led to passage of "Jim Crow" laws in the South and legislation restricting immigration by southern and eastern Europeans, Asians, Africans, and Jews.   

1883    A Checkered Life. Chicago: S. P. Rounds.  Joyce, John A.   

1883    The Bastilles of England; or The Lunacy Laws at Work. London. by Louisa Lowe.    
1884    A Palace Prison; or, The Past and the Present. New York: Fords, Howard & Hulbert Anonymous.
   
1884    Another Section of the “M.S.B.” by L.C.P.  A Boomerang for a Swarm of B.B.B.’s.  Boston: Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.   
       
1885    Prospectus of Hospital Revelations.  How Opinions Vary. Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.        

1885    Twenty-Five Years with the Insane.  Detroit:  John MacFarlane. Putnam, Daniel.       

1885    The Autobiography of Mark Rutherford. New York: Dodd, Mead.  Rutherford, Mark.
1885    The Right Spirit.  Buffalo, NY:  Courier. Cottier, Lizzie D.   

1885    Virginia established an asylum for the “colored insane”in Petersburg.
   
1886    This Red Book is Partly a Reprint of What Was Published in 1883, and Later.  And Earlier Letters from Prominent Men.  Instructions to Dr. Harlow, from Springfield, His Letters from the Hospitals, and Much Else.  Boston:  n.p.. Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.
   
1886    From Under the Cloud or, Personal Reminiscences of Insanity. Cincinnati: Printed by Robert Clarke for the Author.Agnew, Anna.   

1887    Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) an activist and reformist for improving the environments and conditions of lunatic asylums.  She is credited with the establishment of dozens of institutions.     

1887    “Life Among the Insane.” North American Review. 144: 190-199.    Brinkle, Andrianna P.   
       
1887    The Life Story of Sarah Victor. Cleveland: Williams. Victor, Sarah M.

1887    Ten Days in a Madhouse; or, Nellie Bly’s Experience on Blackwell’s Island. Feigning Insanity in Order to Reveal Asylum Horrors. New York: Norman L. Munro. Bly, Nellie. (Elizabeth Cochrane).   
   
1888    Hospital Revelations.  Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.   

1888    “Hospitals for the Insane. Viewed from the Standpoint of Personal Experience, by a Recovered  Patient.”  Alienist and Neurologist. 9: 51-57.     Rutz-Rees, Janet E.
   
1889    An Explanation to the Public as to Why Mrs. Lemira Clarissa Pennell Was Confined in the Insane Hospital and the Portland Poor House.  Augusta, Maine:  n.p..    Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.   
   
1890    New Horrors. Pennell, Lemira Clarissa.   

1890    Dr. Gottlieb performed partial lobotomies on six patients of a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland. He drilled holes into their heads and extracted sections of their frontal lobes. One died after the operation, and another was found dead in a river 10 days after release.
       
1890    New York passes The State Care Act that fosters state responsibility for mental health services.
   
1890    A Secret Institution. New York: Bryant Publishing Co.    Lathrop, Clarissa Caldwell.   
   
1891    In Robert Burton’s synopsis of the causes of melancholy he lists god, devil,
witches, magicians.   
       
1891    Madhouses of America. Cohoes: New York.  Trull, William L.   

1892    American Psychological Association (APA) founded.   

1892    “The Yellow Wallpaper.” New England Magazine. 5(5) 647-56. Gilman, Charlotte Perkins.   

1892    The Great Drama; or, the Millennial Harbinger.  Hartford: Author.     Packard, Elizabeth Parsons Ware.   
       
1893    Three Years in a Mad House. Chicago: Donohue, Henneberry Fleming, E. G.
       
1896    Dementia praecox is first diagnosed.     1896-01-01 00:00:00 -0400       

1896     “The Confessions of a Nervous Woman.” Post Graduate Monthly. Journal of Medicine and Surgery. 11: 364-368. Anonymous.   

1897    Dr. T. O. Powell reported that the Alabama facility had about three hundred and ?fty African-American patients. The facility maintained a “colony" of one hundred
African-American men about two miles from the main facility.

1898     Transactions of the Antiseptic Club. New York: E. B. Treat. Abrams, Albert.       

1898    A Madman's Musings: Being a Collection of Essays Written by a Patient During His Detention in a Private Madhouse. London. by Anonymous.   

1899    Professor Hieronymous (trans. from 1895 Norwegian ed.). London. by Bertha Amalia Skram.
   
1899    Experience of a Criminal. by A. Telso.   

1900    Sigmund Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams revolutionizes psychiatric theory and practice. He is the first to use the unconscious to treat psychiatric illness in patients by using 'psychoanalysis' - free association and interpretation of dreams.   

1900    In the 1900s  the first institutions to treat addiction as a medical problem – i.e. early treatment centers – are created.    
   
1900    Sigmund Freud presented his concepts of psychoanalysis in a publication entitled "The Interpretation of Dreams."       
1901    Charles Woodruff explained intellectual superiority of northern European Christians with essay on civilization & brain development -July, American Journal of Insanity.   
   
1902    Inferno (trans. M. Sandbach).  London. by August Strindberg.   

1904    Clitoridectomies performed in association with women’s mental disorders.

1905    Spiritual Adventures. London. by Arthur Symons.   

1905    Sigmund Freud's Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality describes the stages of sexual development and explains the effects of infantile sexuality on sexual dysfunction.   
       
1905    Bernard Sachs, author of A Treatise on the Nervous Diseases of Children recommends that masturbation in children be treated by cautery to the spine and to the genitals. Cauterize is to burn, sear or destroy tissue.   

1906    The Lunacy Law of the World: Being that of Each of the Forty-Eight States and Territories of the United States, with an Examination Thereof and Leading Cases Thereon; Together with that of the Six Great Powers of Europe—Great Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Russia.  Roanoke Rapids, NC. by John Armstrong Chaloner.   
       
1906    Preventive legislation was needed to curb the increasing dependence on the drugs in patient medicines; the Federal Food and Drug Act of 1906 removed narcotics from those products.   
   
1907    The House of Quiet.  by Arthur Christopher Benson.   

1908    Clifford Beers publishes A Mind That Found Itself, detailing his experiences as a patient in psychiatric hospitals. This work promotes the founding of the mental hygiene movement in the United States. Beers was one of the biggest supporters of the eugenics movement in America, which also flourished in Germany during the early part of the Twentieth Century.    
   
1909    The National Committee for Mental Hygiene is founded by Clifford Beers in New York City.  This was the forerunner of the National Mental Health Association (NMHA).
       
1909    A Man Remade: Or, Out of Delirium's Wonderland. by Charles Roman.
   
1909    My Life as a Dissociated Personality. by B.C.A. (with an introduction by Morton Prince, MD).
       
1909    The Maniac: A Realistic Study of Madness from the Maniac's Point of View. by E. Thelmer.       
1910     “Autopsychology of the Manic-Depressive.”  Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases.  37:  606-20. by Eva Charlotte Reid.   

1910    The Autobiography of a Neurasthenic. by M. A. Cleaves.   

1910    Legally Dead: Experiences During Seventeen Weeks' Detention in a Private Asylum. London. By Marcia Hamilcar   
       
1911    The cure for dementia praecox is said to be found in the restoration to consciousness of certain memories, and the illness is renamed schizophrenia.

1911    The state of Maryland opens the its first psychiatric facility for the "colored insane".
       
1911    Eugen Bleuler, a Swiss psychiatrist, coines the term 'schizophrenia' in his book, Dementia Praecox or the Group of Schizophrenias. He writes that dementia praecox patients do not always develop dementia but instead, 'schizophrenia'.

1912    Eight and One-Half Years in Hell. by Cyrus S. Turner.   

1912    Autobiography of Roosevelt's Adversary. by James Fullerton    1

1912    The Kallikak Family by Henry H. Goddard was a best selling book. It proposed that disability was linked to immorality and alleged that both were tied to genetics.  It advanced the agenda of the eugenics movement. The Threat of the Feeble Minded (pamphlet) created a climate of hysteria allowing for massive human rights abuses of people with disabilities, including institutionalization and forced sterilization.   

       
1912    Remembrances of a Religio-Maniac. Stratford-on-Avon, UK. by D. Davidson.

1912    The Kallikak Family by Henry H. Goddard was a best selling book. It proposed that disability was linked to immorality and alleged that both were tied to genetics.  It advanced the agenda of the eugenics movement. The Threat of the Feeble Minded (pamphlet) created a climate of hysteria allowing for massive human rights abuses of people with disabilities, including institutionalization and forced sterilization.   
       
1912    Thy Rod and Thy Staff. London. by Arthor Christopher Benson.

1914    Psychoanalytic Review published 3 articles on blacks about their inability to work a job connected to mental disorders.
   
1914    Who's Looney Now?  by John Armstrong Chaloner.   

1914    The Harrison Act of was the first effort toward making it impossible for people with addictions to legally obtain drugs.   
1915    My Last Drink. by Joseph H. Francis.   

1917    The Smith-Hughes Vocational Education Act became law.   

1917    Physiologic Shock Treatments: Malaria-Induced Fever. The Austrian psychiatrist Julius von Wagner-Jauregg uses malaria-induced fever to cause remission in patients with slight or incomplete paralysis (also called dementia paralytica).    

1917    Mary MacLane, A Diary of Human Days. by Mary MacLane   

1917    Alfred Adler establishes the school of individual psychology and becomes the first psychoanalyst to challenge Freud. He coins the terms 'lifestyle' and 'inferiority complex' in his book, Study of Organ Inferiority and Its Psychical Compensations.   

1918    The Smith-Sears Veterans Rehabilitation Act provided for the promotion of vocational rehabilitation and return to civil employment of disabled persons discharged from U.S. military.
   
1918    There are now 22 catagories of mental illness.   

1919    Rusk State Penitentiary in Texas was turned into a hospital for the “Negro insane”.
       
1919     “Confessions of an Agoraphobic Victim.”  American Journal of Psychology. 30: 295-299. by VIncent.
   
1919    George Fox: An Autobiography. by George Fox   

1920    The story of Opal – the journal of an understanding heart. The Atlantic Monthly Press. Opal Whiteley.
       
1920    The Smith-Fess Vocational Rehabilitation Act provided for the promotion of vocational rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry.    

1920    A Thousand Faces. by Florence S.Thompson and  George W. Galvin.
   
1920    The United States Office of Vocational Rehabilitation was established.   

1920    The 18th Amendment, ratified in 1920, prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors.   
   
1921    The U.S. Veterans Bureau was established (later known as the Department of Veterans Affairs).

1921    The Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane (AMSAII), becomes the American Psychiatric Association.   
1922    The Experiences of an Asylum Patient. London. by Rachel Grant-Smith.

1922    Narcotic Drug Import and Export Act also called the Jones-Miller Act. Increased penalties and further restricted the import and export of opium and coca.   

1923    Daughters of Fire: Sylvia—Emilie—Octavie (trans. from 1862 French ed.). London. by Gerard Labrunie  [Gerard De Nerval].   

1923    From Harrow School to Herrison House Asylum. London. by Harald Hewitt.   
       
1924    The Commonwealth of Virginia passed a state law that allowed for sterilization (without consent) of individuals found to be "feebleminded, insane, depressed, mentally handicapped, epileptic and other." Alcoholics, criminals and drug addicts were also sterilized.   
       
1924    Heroin Act made the manufacture and possession of heroin illegal   

1925    Cruelties in an Edinburgh Asylum. Edinburgh.  William Simpson.   

1925    Clitoridectomies performed in association with women’s mental disorders.   

1925    The Confession of a Fool (trans. Ellie Scheussner). by August Strindberg.        
1926    Emil Kraepelin (1856–1926) dies.  He is seen as being the founder of modern scientific psychiatry, psychopharmacology and psychiatric genetics.   

1926    The Traitor—Being the Untampered with, Unrevised Account of the Trial and All that Led to it. by Harry K. Thaw   
   
1927    Bureau of Prohibition Created by an act of the same name. Replaced the Bureau of Internal Revenue with a new bureau under the Dept. of Treasury. This is the first organization responsible solely for the enforcement of drug and alcohol laws.
   
1927    On May 2, 1927 the U.S. Supreme Court, in Buck v. Bell (Carrie Buck, AKA Carrie Buck Detamore), rules that the forced sterilization of people with disabilities is not a violation of their constitutional rights. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote, "It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind….Three generations of imbeciles are enough." Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes equated sterilization to vaccination. Nationally, twenty-seven states began wholesale sterilization of "undesirables." The decision removes the last restraints for eugenicists; advocating that people with disabilities be prohibited from having children. By the 1970s, some 60,000 disabled people are sterilized without consent.  This included people identified as having "mental illness."   
1927    Julius von Wagner-Jauregg using malaria-induced fever becomes the first psychiatrist to win the Nobel prize.
       
1927    Reluctantly Told. by Jane Hillyer.
       
1927    The Locomotive God. by W. E. Leonard.   

1927    Physiological Shock Treatment: Insulin Coma and Convulsions are used as a treatment for the first time.   

1928    Exposure of the Asylum System. by M. J. Nolan   

1928    Sanity for Sale: The Story  of the Rise and Fall of William B. Ellis, by  Himself. by William B. Ellis.
   
1929    Sanity for Sale: The Story of American Life Since the Civil War. by William B. Ellis.
   
1929    Pick Up the Pieces. b Emerson D. Owens. [North 3-1].

1929    Reminiscences of a Stay in a Mental Hospital. London. by Mary Riggall.
   
1929    The Layman Looks at Doctors. by S.W. Pierce and J. T. (pseudonym).

1929    When—A Record of Transition. J. L. Pole.   

1930     “Wondering. The Impressions of an Inmate.” Atlantic Monthly. 145: 669. by Anonymous.   
   
1930    The Shutter of Snow. E. H. Coleman.   

1930    Federal Bureau of Narcotics replaced the Bureau of Prohibition and moved the enforcement of drug laws from the Dept. of Treasury to the Dept. of Justice. Its first commissioner, the infamous Harry Anslinger, began actions to control cannabis in addition to opium and coca.   
   
1930    The U.S. Public Health Service establishes the Narcotics Division, later named the Division of Mental Hygiene.   
       
1930    Confessions: A Study in Pathology. by Arthur Symons.   

1931    Guilty but Insane: A Broadmoor Autobiography. London. by Wannack (pseudonym).

1931    The International Foundation for Mental Health Hygiene is founded by Clifford Beers.
       
1931    The Recovery of Myself: A Patient’s Experience in a Hospital for Mental Illness. by Marian King.
       
1931    Sketches in the Life of John Clare (written by himself, first published with an introduction, notes and additions, by Edmund Blunden). London. b John Clare.
   
1931    Sane in Asylum Walls. London. by James Scott.   

1932    The Disabled American Veterans was chartered by Congress to represent disabled veterans in their dealings with the federal government.   

1932    The Disabled American Veterans was chartered by Congress to represent disabled veterans in their dealings with the federal government.    

1932    Uniform State Narcotic Act encouraged states to pass uniform state laws matching the federal Narcotic Drug Import and Export Act. Suggested prohibiting cannabis use at the state level. By 1937 every state had passed laws prohibiting cannabis use.
   
1932     Behind the Door of Delusion. by Inmate Ward Eight [Marion Woodson].
   
1932    I Lost My Memory--The Case as the Patient Saw It. London. by Anonymous.        
1933    Mania. by Lawrence M. Jayson.
       
1933    The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment, which meant that states once again had the right to enact laws regulating the sale and use of alcoholic beverages.
   
1933    Dreams and Life (trans. from 1855 French ed.). London. by Gerard Labrunie  [Gerard De Nerval].    

1933    Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the first physically disabled person ever to be elected as a head of government, is sworn into office as president of the United States.        
1933    Two Lives. by W. E. Leonard.
       
1934    Physiologic Shock Treatment: Metrazol Convulsions are first used.   

1934    Magpie: The Autobiography of a Nymph Errant. by Lois Vidal.   

1935    Sigmund Freud states in his "Letter to an American Mother" that, "Homosexuality is assuredly no advantage, but it is nothing to be ashamed of, no vice, no degradation; it cannot be classified as an illness."   
1935    The Social Security Act was passed. This established federally funded old-age benefits and funds to states for assistance to blind individuals and disabled children. The Act extended existing vocational rehabilitation programs.   

1935    The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. by Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
   
1935    My First Life; a Biography, by Brenda Dean Paul, Written By Herself.  London. by Brenda Dean Paul.    

1935    Bill W. and Dr. Bob found the self-help society known as Alcoholics Anonymous on June 10, 1935.
   
1935    Man the Unknown, written by Nobel Prize winning Dr. Alexis Carrel, suggested the removal of criminals and the mentally ill by euthanasia, using institutions equipped with suitable gases.   
   
1935    The Committee for the Study of Sex Variants is formed.

1935    Asylum. by William Seabrook.   
   
1935    New Armor for Old. by William O'Sullivan Molony.   

1936    Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky by Vaslav Nijinsky, (ed. Joan Accocella). (republished in 1999).
       
1936    Prefrontal Lobotomy was performed by the Portuguese physician and neurologist Antonio Egas Moniz.  His method involved drilling holes in patients' heads and destroying the tissue connecting the frontal lobes by injecting alcohol into them.            
1936    The Exploration of the Inner World. Anton T. Boisen.   

1937    Marihuana Tax Act.Made it federally illegal to buy, sell, barter, or give away cannabis without paying a transfer tax. This is the first federal law regulating the possession and sale of cannabis. Declared unconstitutional in 1969 in U.S. vs Timothy Leary.
   
1937    Chronicles of Interdict No. 7807. by Anne Kirk.   

1937    Searchlight, an Autobiography. by Augusta Catherine Fischer.   

1937    J. Edgar Hoover declares “War on the Sex Criminal!”   

1937    Dear Theo: The Autobiography of Vincent Van Gogh (ed. Irving Stone). by Vincent Van Gogh.
       
1937    Recovery, Inc. is a self-help mental health program based on the ground breaking work of our founder a neuropsychiatrist, the late Abraham A. Low, M.D.       

1937    A Patient's Memoirs. “The Rocket Buster." by G. C. Wegefarth.

1937    A Mind Restored: The  Story of Jim Curran. by Elsa Krauch.   

1937    A Mind Mislaid. by Henry Collins Brown.    

1937    1935 -1936. by William Cary Sanger.   

1938    “They Said I was Mad.” The Forum and Century. 100: 231-237. by Anonymous.   
       
1938    Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act revised and expanded the Pure Food and Drug Act to require more extensive labelling and safety testing of food products. Introduced safety standards and required that new drugs be shown to be safe before marketing.   
   
1938    Physiological Shock Treatment: electric shock therapy (EST), currently known as electroconvulsive treatment (ECT)  is first used by Ugo Cerletti.

1938    The Witnesses. London. by Thomas Barcley Hennell.   

1939    The Insanity Racket: A Story of One of the Worst Hell Holes in This Country. by Luther Osborne.   
   
1939    The Capital's Siberia. by James Duffy.   

1939    World War II begins and Hitler decrees “mercy killings” that patients with incurable medical illnesses be killed because they are 'biologically unfit.' Approximately 270,000 patients with mental illness are killed by physicians and medical personnel complying with the Nazi doctrine of racial purity.  The Nazi euthanasia program was code-named Aktion T4 and was instituted to eliminate "life unworthy of life."
   
1940    Borderland Minds. by Margaret Isabel Wilson   

1940    They Call Them Camisoles. by W. Wilson.   

1940    Selective Service Medical Circular No. 1 recommends that doctors screen out homosexuals from military draftees.   
       
1940    908 patients were transferred from an institution for retarded and chronically ill patients in Schoenbrunn, Germany to the euthanasia installation at Eglfing-Haar to be gassed. A monument to the victims stands in the courtyard at Schoenbrunn.    
   
1940    Criminal Complaints with Probable Causes (A True Account). Bound, circular letter. by Percy L. King   
       
1940    “Insulin and I.” American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 10: 810-814.     by Anonymous.
   
1940    The Book of Margery Kempe (edited and introduced by Sanford Brown Meech and Hope Emily Allen). Oxford. by Margery Kempe.   

1940    Asylum Piece. by Helen Woods Edmonds.   

1940    Newdigate Owensby promotes pharmacological shock treatment for the treatment of homosexuality.   
   
1940    The Bridge of Eternity. by Looney Lee Gary (pseudonym).   

1940     “A Critical Examination of the Concept of Bisexuality”   

1940     “Postscript on a Benign Psychosis.”  Psychiatry.  3:  527-34. by Elaine F. Kinder.

1941    Spinner's Lake. London. by Maude Harrison.   

1941    The Triumph of Personal Thought and How I Became a Mason. by Jacob Alexson.   
       
1941    Hitler suspended the Aktion T4 program that killed nearly one hundred thousand people. Euthanasia continued through the use of drugs and starvation instead of gassings.   
       
1941    California Justice: Is This Supposed to Be a Democracy? by Arthur Penn.   
       
1941     “Minds in the Mending.”  Atlantic Monthly.  168:  330-34. Olivia Harlan.

1942    The Eclipse of a Mind. by Alonzo Graves.   

1942    No Hiding Place: An Autobiography. by William Seabrook.   

1943    Prelude to Sanity. S. Greiner.   
   
1943    Autobiography. and A Ray of Darkness. (no date) Oxford. by Margiad Evans.   
   
1943    Clifford Beers dies.   
   
1944    Brainstorm. by Carlton Brown.   
1944    The Book of Margery Kempe. Rendered into modern English by W. Butler-Bowdon. by Margery Kempe.   
   
1944    The Lost Weekend. by C. Jackson.   

1945    A Man Against Time: An Heroic Dream. by W. E. Leonard.   

1946    The Snake Pit. by Mary Jane Ward.   

1946    First They Came
First they came for the Communists, and I didn't speak up, because I wasn't a Communist.
Then they came for the sick, the so-called incurables, and I didn't speak up, because I wasn't mentally ill.
Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up, because I wasn't a Jew.
Then they came for me, and by that time there was no one left to speak up for me.
Modern translation of poem by Martin Niemoeller   

1946    The National Mental Health Foundation is founded by conscientious objectors who served as attendants at state mental institutions during World War II. It works to expose the abusive conditions at these facilities and becomes an early impetus in the push for deinstitutionalization.   
       
1946    Out of the Dark Ages.”  Woman’s Home Companion.  34-35, 91-92; August. by Mary Jane Ward.   
   
1946    Anna Freud, the youngest daughter of Sigmund Freud, publishes The Psychoanalytic Treatment of Children, which introduces basic concepts in the theory and practice of child psychoanalysis.   
   
1946    The Abrupt Self. by David Martens.   

1946    President Truman signs the National Mental Health Act, creating for the first time in US history a significant amount of funding for psychiatric education and research and leading to the creation of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).   

1946    Walter Freeman first performs a transorbital lobotomy on a live patient. This new form of psychosurgery was intended for use in State mental hospitals that often did not have the facilities for anesthesia, so Freeman suggested using electroconvulsive therapy to render the patient unconscious.(Jack, 2005).   

1946    “My Way Back to Sanity.” Ladies Home Journal. 63(10): 54-55, 242-250.     by Jane Elliot.   
       
1946    Autobiography of David ----(ed. Ernest Raymond). London. by David (pseudonym).
1947    These are my Sisters: An “Insandectomy.” by Lara Jefferson.   

1947    The Kingdom of the Lost. London. by John Andrerw Howard Ogdon.
       
1947    Between Us and the Dark. by Lenore McCall.   

1947    The Nuremberg Trials convicted a number of psychiatrists who held key positions in Nazi regimes.   
   
1947    If a Man Be Mad. by H. Maine.
       
1948    Inside the Asylum. London. by John Vincent.   

1948    The Stubborn Wood. by Emily Harvin (pseudonym).   

1948    The combined specialty of 'neuropsychiatry' was divided into 'neurology,' dealing with organic or physical diseases of the brain, and 'psychiatry' dealing with emotional and behavioral problems.   
       
1948    The combined specialty of 'neuropsychiatry' was divided into 'neurology,' dealing with organic or physical diseases of the brain, and 'psychiatry' dealing with emotional and behavioral problems.   
   
1948    We Are Not Alone (WANA), a mental patients' self-help group, is organized in New York City by people who were incarcerated at Rockland State Hospital. Their goal was to help others make the difficult transition from hospital to community.   

1948    Views of a Nearsighted Cannoneer. by Seymour Krim.   

1948    Fountain House opens in New York City.  This is the first of the clubhouse model, influenced by WANA. (We are not alone).    

1949    The World Next Door. by Fritz Peters.

1949    D. O. Cauldwell first describes “psychopathic transsexualism”.    1

1949    A Doctor Regrets, Being the First Part of "A Publisher Presents Himself." London. by Donald McIntosh Johnson.
   
1949    The Australian psychiatrist John Cade shows that lithium quieted “manic patients".   
   
1949    Antonio Egas Muniz wins the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his work on the lobotomy.   
   
1949    The Third Strike. by Jerry Gray.       
1950    The Other Side of the Bottle. by Dwight Anderson (with Page Cooper).    

1950    Beginning of Senator Joseph Macarthy’s hearings on communists in the government; purges of homosexuals from government.   

1950    Social Security Amendments established a federal-state program to aid permanently and totally disabled persons.   

1950    In Childhood and Society, Erik Erikson restates Freud's concepts of infantile sexuality and develops the concepts of 'adult identity,' and 'identity crisis.'       

1950    Mary Switzer was appointed the Director of the U.S. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation where she emphasized independent living as a quality of life issue.   
   
1951    The Homosexual in America by Edward Sagarin under the pseudonym Donald Webster Cory.
   
1951    Fight against Fears. by Lucy Freeman.

1951    The Boggs Act imposed mandatory minimum sentences for those convicted of violating the Narcotic Drug Import and Export Act or the Marihuana Tax Act. These minimums were mostly repealed in 1970.

1951    Autobiography of a Schizophrenic Girl (trans. from 1950 French ed.). edited by Marguerite Sechehaye.   
   
1951    Mattachine Society founded in Los Angeles.   

1952    The American Psychiatric Association publishes the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. There are 112 mental disorders in its initial, 1952 edition.   
   
1952    The Cardboard Giants. by Pau Hackett.   

1952    The American Psychiatric Association publishes the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

1952     “Recovery from a Long Neurosis.” Psychiatry 15: 161-177. by Anonymous (Mrs. F. H.).
       
1952    Bars and Barricades, Being the Second Part of "A Publisher Presents Himself." London. by Donald McIntosh Johnson.

1952    George Jorgensen undergoes sex reassignment surgery in Denmark to become Christine Jorgensen,   
1952    Wisdom, Madness and Folly: The Philosophy of a Lunatic. by John Custance (pseudonym).    

1952    The French psychiatrists Jean Delay and Pierre Deniker report that chlorpromazine (Thorazine ®) calms hospitalized chronic schizophrenic patients without causing clinically significant depression. The drug is called 'hibernotherapie' because patients became quiet, like animals in hibernation.   

1952    Homosexuality is mentally diagnosed as Sexual Deviation Personality Disorder.   
   
1952    How Thin the Veil: A Newspaperman's Story of His Own Mental Crackup and Recovery. by Jack Kerkoff.   

1953    Hell's Cauldron. by Gerald Erasmus Wilcox [Thomas G. E. Wilkes].   

1953    And Lo, the Star. by Margaret Atkins McGarr.   

1953    To Hell and Back. The Story of an Alcoholic. by James E. Hummal [James H. Ellis].
       
1953    BF Skinner publishes Science and Human Behavior, describing his theory of operant conditioning, an important concept in the development of behavior therapy.   

1954    First psychiatric drugs are created contributing to the begining of deinstitutionalization and a host of problems.  Chlorpomazine (Thorazine) receives FDA approval.   
   
1954    I’ll Cry Tomorrow. by Lillian Roth with Mike Connolly and Gerald Frank.
           
1954    This is Norman Brokenshire—An Unvarnished Self-Portrait.  by Normen Brokenshire.
       
1954    Long Journey; a Verbatim Report of a Case of Severe Psychosexual Infantilism. by Harold Kenneth Fink.   
       
1954    The U.S. Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka ruled that separate schools for black and white children are unequal and unconstitutional. This pivotal decision became a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement.

1954    Justice and Justices. by Basil Hubbard Pollitt.   

1954    Episode—A Record of Five Hundred Lost Days. by Peter W. Denzer.   
1954    Mary Switzer, Director of the U.S. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, authorized funds for more than 100 university-based rehabilitation-related programs.   
1954    Vocational Rehabilitation Amendments were passed that authorized federal grants to expand programs available to people with physical disabilities.    

1954    Adventure into the Unconscious. London. by John Custance (pseudonym).        
1955    Voices Calling. by Lisa Wiley.
       
1955    Fear Strikes Out: The Jim Piersall Story. by James Piersall ans Albert Hirshberg.   

1955    Resident patients in state and county hospitals in the U.S. peaks at around 550,000.   
   
1955    The Texas hospital for the “Negro insane achieved notoriety when, on April 16, 1955, a group of African- American prisoners in the maximum-security unit rebelled and took over the hospital for ?ve hours. The rebellion was led by nineteen-year-old Ben Riley, who articulated inmate demands for better counseling, organized exercise periods, an end to prisoner beatings, and that all inmates have the same rights enjoyed by the white inmates regarding meals, bathing and freedom of movement.   

1955    Congress authorizes the Mental Health Study Act.   

1955    The Mind in Chains (Autobiography of  a Schizophrenic). William L. Moore.
   
1955    Daughters of Bilitis founded in San Francisco.   

1955    Ward N-1. by John White.   
   
1955    Deinstitutionalization began with the US inpatient census peaking with 550,000 people institutionalized.   
   
1956    Evelyn Hooker begins publishing research on the psychology of non-clinical homosexuals, based on work begun in the 1940s   

1956    Congress passes the Social Security Amendments of 1956, which creates a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program for disabled workers aged 50 to 64.   
   
1956    Schizophrenia, 1677: A Psychiatric Study of an Illustrated Autobiographical Record of Demoniacal Possession. by Christoph Haizmann (eds. Ida Macalpine and Richard Hunter).    

1956    Narcotics Control Act also known as the Daniels Act. Further increased penalties and mandatory minimums for violations of existing drug laws.   

1956    A Tale Told by a Lunatic. Dumfries. by Isabella Millar Norrison.

1956    The American Medical Association formally recognizes alcoholism as a disease and the insurance industry begins to underwrite addiction treatment.

1957    No Hiding Place. by Beth Day.   

1957`British Wolfenden Commission recommends decriminalization of homosexuality.

1957    Too Much, Too Soon. by Dianna Barrymore.   

1957    The first pharmacologic treatment for depression is reported with the work of Kuhn on the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and of Loomer, Saunders and Kline on the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor iproniazid.   

1957    The God Within. by Christina M. Valentine.   

1957    The Plague of Psychiatry. by D. G. Simpson.

1957    Selected Writings. by Gerard de. Nerval. (trans. Geoffrey Wagner).   

1958    The Inside of the Cup.  London. by A. Wingfield.

1958    Mine Enemy Grows Older. by Alexander King.   

1958    Social Security Amendments of 1958 extended Social Security Disability Insurance benefits to dependents of disabled workers.   

1958    A Lawyer's Story In and Out of the World of Insanity. by Basil Hubbard Pollitt.   
   
1958    Like a Lamb. London. by Ella Hales (pseudonym).

1958    Rehabilitation Gazette (formerly known as the Toomeyville Gazette), edited by Gini Laurie, was a grassroots publication which became an early voice for disability rights, independent living and cross-disability organizing. It featured articles by writers with disabilities

1958    Operators and Things: The Inner Life of a Schizophrenic. London. by Barbara O'Brien (pseudonym).
   
1958    The Lost Days of My life. London. by Jane Simpson.   

1959    Breakdown. by Robert G. Dahl.   
   
1959    Light Beyond Shadows: A Minister and Mental Health. by Robert Frederick West.   

1959    My Fight for Sanity. London. by Judith Kruger.   

1959    The Taste of Ashes—An Autobiography. by Bill Stern and Oscar Fraley.   
   
1959    Cynicism and Realism of a Psychotic. by John L. Schmacher.   

1959    Prodigal Shepherd. by Father Ralph Pfau.

1960    Out of the Depths. by Anton T. Boisen.   

1960    A study by E. Morton Jellinek proposed the earliest version of the modern disease theory of alcoholism.  American Medical Association recognizes Alcoholism as a disease in the 1960s   
   
1960    I Can't Forget. by Eloise Davenport.   

1960    Scientists at the American pharmaceutical company Hoffmann-LaRoche develop the benzodiazepines chlordiazepoxide (Librium ®)   

1960     A study by E. Morton Jellinek proposed the earliest version of the modern disease theory of alcoholism.  American Medical Association recognizes Alcholism as a disease in the 1960s   

1960    Kurt Freund uses pharmacological aversion therapy to cure homosexuality.
   
1960    “Living with Schizophrenia.” Canadian Medical Association Journal, 82, 218-222. by Norma McDonald.   

1960    To Bedlam & Part Way Back. by Anne Sexton.   

1960    In a Forest Dark. by Harry Feldman.   

1960    Since 1960 more than 90 percent of state psychiatric hospital beds have been eliminated.   
   
1960    The Harvard Psylocibin Project conducted by Leary, T. and Alpert, R. concludes in 1962.

1960    Social Security Amendments of 1960 eliminated the restriction that disabled workers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance benefits must be 50 or older.   
1961    The Joint Commission on Mental Illness and Health's 1961 Action for Mental Health Study was a result of the Mental Health Study Act (1955).   
1961    Sweetheart, I Have Been to School. by Mary Noone (pseudonym).   

1961    The Ha-Ha. by Jennifer Dawson.
   
1961    Asylums: Essays on the social situation of mental patients and other inmates. New York: Anchor Books. Goffman, E.    
   
1961    Shock Treatment. by Winfred Van Atta.   

1961    Faces in the Water. by Janet Frame.   

1961    In the Forests of the Night. London. by S. Martel.   

1961    Self and Others. Pelican Books. Laing, R.D.    

1961    Pencil Shavings—Memoirs. Cambridge. by Olive Higgins Prouty.

1961    The Myth of Mental Illness by Thomas Szasz   

1962    Mental Hospital. by Morton M. Hunt.   

1962    The World is a Wedding. by Bernard Kops.

1962    Edward Roberts sued to gain admission to the University of California. (James Meredith sued to become the first black person to attend the University of Mississippi.) Edward V. Roberts becomes the first severely disabled student at the University of California at Berkeley   
   
1962    Nothing to Lose. London. by Clare Marc Wallace.   

1962    Battered Child Syndrome recognized by middle class, but recognized in lower class. Poor children rescued from bad, incompetent parents.   

1963    No Man Stands Alone—The True Story of Barney Ross. by Barney Ross.
       
1963    Ola Mae Quarterman-Clemons was only 18 years old when she refused to sit on the back of the bus in that same town, and spent the next thirty days in jail.

1963    President Kennedy signs the Mental Health Centers Act to substitute comprehensive community care for custodial institutional care.    

1963    And Always Tomorrow. by Sarah E. Lorenz.



1963    President John Kennedy, in an address to Congress, calls for a reduction, "over a number of years and by hundreds of thousands, (in the number) of persons confined" to residential institutions, and he asks that methods be found "to retain in and return to the community the mentally ill and mentally retarded, and there to restore and revitalize their lives through better health programs and strengthened educational and rehabilitation services." President Kennedy signs the Community Mental Health Centers Act to substitute comprehensive community care for custodial institutional care. Though not labeled such at the time, this is a call for deinstitutionalization and increased community services.   
       
1963    Congress passes the Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Health Centers Construction Act, authorizing federal grants for the construction of public and private nonprofit community mental health centers.

1963    Scientists at the American pharmaceutical company Hoffmann-LaRoche develop the benzodiazepines diazepam (Valium ®)

1963    I Was a Mental Statistic. by Edward X. Lane   

1963    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual has grown to 168 mental disorders in the DSM-II from the 112 mental disorders in its initial, 1952 edition.   
       
1963    'Deinstitutionalization' is mandated by the Community Mental Health Centers Act.   
       
1963    The Bell Jar. by Sylvia Plath.
       
1964    Chastise Me with Scorpions. by Laura Rhodes and Lucy Freeman.   

1964    Civil Rights Act signed by President Lyndon Johnson prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, and creed -- later, gender was added as a protected class.
       
1964    23 unmarried mothers per 1000 in mental hospitals. reason: pregnant.
   
1964    Diary of a Paranoiac. by Edwin Mumford.

1964    The Divided Self: The Healing of a Nervous Disorder. London. by Wlater Steward Spencer [W. S. Stewart].   

1964    God Gets in the Way of a Sailor. by H. G. Thach.

1964    M. P. Feldman and M. K. MacCulloch report on the use of electric shock aversion therapy in the treatment of homosexuality.   
1964    I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. by Joanne Greenberg [Hannah Green].
1964    Truth Forever on the Scaffold: I Tried to Help My Country. by James Ross.
   
1964    Sanity, Madness and the Family. R.D. Laing & Aaron Esterson.

1964    The Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health was issued and it documented that smoking cigarettes caused cancer and other serious diseases.
   
1964    Episode: Report on the Accident Inside My Skull. by E. Hodgins.

1964    Beyond All Reason. London. by Morag Coate.   

1964    The White Shirts. by E. Field.   
       
1964    The Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health was issued and it documented that smoking cigarettes caused cancer and other serious diseases.
   
1965    Portrait of a Schizophrenic Nurse. London. by Clare Marc Wallace.

1965    Memoirs of an Amnesiac. by Oscar Levant.   

1965    In Search of Sanity: The Journal of a Schizophrenic. by Gregory Stefan.
   
1965    All the Hairs on My Head Hurt. by Dressler La Marr [Jinxy R. Howell].        
1965    Vocational Rehabilitation Amendments of 1965 were passed authorizing federal funds for expansion of existing vocational rehabilitation programs.

1965    Madness and Civilization by Michel Foucault.   

1965    Bureau of Drug Abuse Control formed under the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Responsible for enforcing the Drug Abuse Control Amendment.
   
1965    Spy Wife. by B. W. Powers and W. Diehl.   

1965    Medicare and Medicaid were established through passage of the Social Security Amendments of 1965, providing federally subsidized health care to disabled and elderly Americans covered by the Social Security program. These amendments changed the definition of disability under Social Security Disability Insurance program from "of long continued and indefinite duration" to "expected to last for not less than 12 months."    
   
1965    Drug Abuse Control Amendment regulated, for the first time, the sale and possession of stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. It restricted research into psychoactives such as LSD by requiring FDA approval.   

1965    Ward Seven: An Autobiographical Novel. by Valeriy Tarsis. (trans. from 1965 Russian ed.).
       
1965    Washington Mattachine Society adopts a resolution declaring that “homosexuality is not a sickness”.
       
1966    Mishaps, Perhaps. by C. Solomon.   

1966    Dr. Robert Morgan: "In summary, even one or two ECT treatments risk limbic damage in the brain leading to retarded speed, coordination, handwriting, concentration, attention span, memory, response flexibility, retention, and re-education. On the psychological side, fear of ECT has produced stress ulcers, renal disease, confusion, amnesic withdrawal, and resistance to re-educative or psychological therapy. The research thus indicated that ECT was a slower-acting lobotomy with the added complications of shock-induced terror."
       
1966    Woman in Two Worlds; a Personal Story of Psychological Experience. by Wanda Martin.   
       
1966    Crazy. by Jane Doe (pseudonym).

1967    The Politics of Experience & The Bird of Paradise. Penguin Books. Laing, R.D.
   
1967    The American Woman and Alcohol. by P. Kent.   

1967    Five Years in Mental Hospitals: An Autobiographical Essay. by Arthur Wellon.
       
1967    By Reason of Insanity. by John Balt.   

1968    Born To Trouble:  Portrait of a Psychopath. by R. Lloyd.   

1968    Homophile activists protest against Dr. Charles Socarides at the American Medical Association meeting in San Francisco.   

1968    Tornado: My Experience with Mental Illness. by Hellen Moeller.

1968    Half a Lifetime. by Alton Brea.
       
1968    Bureau of Narcotics & Dangerous Drugs is created by executive order, under the Department. of Justice, by merging the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and the Bureau of Drug Abuse Control.   

1968    DSM-II reclassifies the sexual deviations as a separate category of personality disorders.   
       
1968    The Unimportance of Being Oscar. by Oscar Levant,   
1968    Never Come Early. by Joseph J. Partyka   

1968    More Mishaps. by C. Solomon.
       
1969    Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases describes how they attempted to reduce the aggressive behavior of a thirty-one year old schizophrenic woman by shocking her with a cattle prod whenever she made accusation of being persecuted and abused; made verbal threats, or committed aggressive acts.   

1969    Aftershock. by Ellen Wolfe.   
       
1969    Insane Liberation Front (ILF) is organized by Howie The Harp (homeless advocate), Dorothy Weiner (union organizer) and Tom Wittick (political activist/organizer) in Portland, Oregon.  It is the first known, modern, organized, self-help, advocacy, ex-patient group that was dedicated to liberation from psychiatry.   

1969    My Testimony. by Anatoly Marchenko   

1969    Dr. Herbert Modlin, “managed” a group of paranoid women back to feminine health; he helped them re-establish their relationships with their husbands. He decided that his paranoid ‘patients needed strong male control, both within their marriages and within the hospital.

1969    Fear No Evil. by John E. Leach.   

1969    National Institute of Mental Health Task Force on Homosexuality, headed by Evelyn Hooker, completes its Final Report; publication delayed until 1972.   

1969    The Stonewall Inn riots in New York’s Greenwich Village ignites a radical gay rights movement.   
       
1969    The Prison of My Mind. by Barbara Fields Benziger.   

1970    Pedagogy of the Oppressed.  by Paulo Friere   

1970    The Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act consolidated drug laws and strengthened law enforcement; it also authorized the Controlled Substances Act classifying drugs based on medical value, harmfulness, and potential for abuse or addiction.   
   
1970    First Christopher Street Liberation Day March in New York City commemorating the Stonewall riots.   
   
1970    Power/knowledge: Selected interviews and other writings 1972-1977. Ed. C. Gordon. New York: Pantheon Books. Foucault, M.   
1970    Psychiatry and Anti-Psychiatry. David Cooper   
1970    Sojourn in a Palace for Peculiars. by Marty Roberts.   

1970    The Other Caroline. by Mary Jane Ward.   

1970    By 1970 the woman’s movement, gay rights movement and the disabilities rights movement emerged.   

1970    Edward Roberts formed a group on campus called the Rolling Quads and one year after that, Ed and his associates established the nation’s first Center for Independent Living (CIL).  15 years after being told he was “too disabled to work”, Ed was appointed as the head of Vocational Rehabilitation for California in, and established 9 CILs in the state in 1975.   Today there are over 300 CILs nationwide.  Ed is known as the father of the independent living movement.   

1970    Gay rights activists storm panels on homosexuality at the American Psychiatric Association (APA) annual convention in San Francisco.

1970    Mental. UK. by Robert Quentin Nelson.   

1970    The Food and Drug Administration approves lithium to treat people diagnosed with manic-depression.   
   
1970    Beginning in the 1970s, The Mental Patients Union (MPU) and Community  Organisation for Psychiatric Emergencies (COPE) established, evolving eventually into the Campaign Against Psychiatric Oppression (CAPO).    1

1970    The Controlled Substance Act replaced the Drug Abuse Control Amendment. Organized federally regulated drugs (including opiates, coca, cannabis, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens) into five schedules with varying restrictions and penalties.   

1971    The initial National Household Survey on Drug Abuse is completed.   

1971    President Nixon identified drug abuse as "public enemy number one in the United States" and launched the war on drugs and crime.   

1971    Emotions Anonymous, founded in St. Paul, Minnesota.    

1971    Bird's Nest Soup. by Hanna Greally.

1971    Beneath the Underdog, His World as Composed by Mingus.  by C. Mingus (editor N. King).   
   
1971    The National Center for Law and the Handicapped was founded at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. It became the first legal advocacy center for people with disabilities in the U. S.   
1971    The U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Alabama hands down its first decision in Wyatt v. Stickney, ruling that people in residential state schools and institutions have a constitutional right "to receive such individual treatment as (would) give them a realistic opportunity to be cured or to improve his or her mental condition." Disabled people can no longer simply be locked away in "custodial institutions" without treatment or education. This decision is a crucial victory in the struggle for deinstitutionalization.   

1971    Center for the Study of Legal Authority and Mental Patient Status (also known as LAMP) begun in Berkeley by David Richman   

1971    A Question of Madness (trans. from 1971 Russian ed.). by Zhores Medvedev.
   
1971    Bellevue Is a State of Mind. by Anne Barry.

1971    A Time  and a Time.  London. by S. Davys.

1971    “Life on a Psychiatric Ward.” Mind. by Anonympous.   

1971    Secrets of the Trade:  Notes on Madness, Creativity and Ideology. by J. K. Adams.
       
1971    The Manufacture of Madness. New York: Dell Publishing Co./Delta, Szasz, Thomas S.
   
1971    Mental Patients Liberation Project (MPLP) founded by Howie The Harp in New York City wrote a Mental Patients’ Bill of Rights.   

1971    The initial National Household Survey on Drug Abuse is completed.   

1971    Confessions from the Malaga Madhouse:  A Christmas Diary.  by Charlotte Painter.
   
1971    Mental Patients' Association in Vancouver, Canada begins operating drop-in centers and residences within months of it's founding.   

1971    Annual APA meeting in Washington DC features first-ever panel of gay people speaking about " Lifestyles of Non-Patient Homosexuals".
       
1971    A Leaf of Spring. by A. Yesenin-Volpin.   

1971    The Radical Therapist, a journal begun in 1971 in North Dakota by Michael Glenn, David Bryan, Linda Bryan, Michael Galan and Sara Glenn, challenged the psychotherapy establishment in a number of ways, raising the slogan "Therapy means change, not adjustment."   

1971    Founding of Bonita House a halfway house in Berkeley, CA for persons who have been in psychiatric hospitals with c/s/x activist Sherry Hirsch as Executive Director.
   
1971    Mental Patients Liberation Front (MPLF) founded by two ex-patients in Boston (still in existence and sponsors the Ruby Rogers Advocacy and Drop-In Center).  Printed at the New England Free Press, a 56 page document entitled “Your Rights as a Mental Patient in Massachusetts”.    
   
1971    Out of the Depths.  by William J. Collins.   

1971    The original Soteria House opened in 1971. A replication facility opened in 1974 in another suburban San Francisco Bay Area City. Despite the publication of consistently positive results the Soteria Project ended in 1983.   

1972    The Commonwealth of Virginia ceased its sterilization program (begun in 1924). 8300 individuals never received justice regarding their sterilizations.

1972    Will There Really Be a Morning? by Frances Farmer.   

1972    A Mingled Yarn. by Beulah Parker.

1972    Red Square at Noon.  London. by N. Gorbanevskaya.

1972    First edition of Madness Network News is published.   

1972    The Legal Action Center (Washington, D.C. and New York City) was founded to advocate for the interests of people with alcohol or drug dependencies and later for people with HIV/AIDS.   
   
1972    Saints and Strait Jackets: An Intimate View of Life in an Australian Psychiatric Hospital, By an Ex-Patient. by Barbara Heaslip.   

1972    Women and Madness.  Phyllis Chesler.   
       
1972    The Network Against Psychiatric Assault (NAPA) is organized in San Francisco.
       
1972    Twice Through the Lines: The Autobiography of Otto John. by John Otto.
       
1972    Memoirs of a Mental Case. by Howard J. Etten.   

1972    APA annual meeting sponsors panel--"Psychiatry:   Friend or Foe to Homosexuals:   A Dialogue"--that includes gay activists, gay sympathetic psychiatrists, and a disguised gay psychiatrist, Dr. H Anonymous (John Fryer, MD).

1972    Mental Patients Alliance of Central New York is established.  Carol Hayes-Collier is instrumental to the effort.
1972    The Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is founded in Washington, D.C, to provide legal representation and to advocate for the rights of people with mental illness.   
       
1972    Bound for Broadmoor. London. by Peter Thompson.   

1972    Fragments from the Diary of a Madman. London. by Pawel Cienin.

1972    Social Security Amendments of 1972 created the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.  The law relieved families of the financial responsibility of caring for their adult disabled children.  

1972    APA annual meeting sponsors panel--"Psychiatry:   Friend or Foe to Homosexuals:   A Dialogue"--that includes gay activists, gay sympathetic psychiatrists, and a disguised gay psychiatrist, Dr. H Anonymous (John Fryer, MD).

1972    The Rehabilitation Act was passed by Congress and vetoed by President Richard Nixon.   
   
1973    Peter Breggin, M.D. founds the Center for the Study of Psychiatry.

1973    Journey Out of Nowhere. by Nancy Covert Smith.

1973    I Couldn't Catch the Bus Today: The True Story of a Nervous Breakdown That Became a Pilgrimage. by David Lazell.
   
1973    Back to Earth. by Edwin E. "buzz" Aldrin Jr. (with Wayne Warga).

1973    ADAMHA (Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration) established.
   
1973    Recovery. by John Berryman.
   
1973    The Journal of Judith Beck Stein. by Judith Beck Stein.

1973    A Guard Within. London. by Sarah Ferguson.

1973    Madhouse. by Robert Goulet.   

1973 The Drug Enforcement Administration is created by executive order under the Dept. of Justice. Combined the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs and several other law enforcement organizations.   
   
1973     “New Threat to Blacks: Brain Surgery to Control Behavior—Controversial Operations Are Coming Back As Violence Curbs. ”Ebony 1973,February, p. 63–72. Mason, B. J.   
   
1973    Someone With Me: The Autobiography of William Kurelek. by William Kurelek (editor J. Maas).   

1973    The Rehabilitation Act passed. Of particular interest, Title V, Sections 501, 503 and 504 prohibited discrimination in federal programs and services and all other programs or services receiving federal funds. Key language in the Rehabilitation Act, found in Section 504, states “No otherwise qualified handicapped individual in the United States, shall, solely by reason of his handicap, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”   

1973    The first Conference on Human Rights and Psychiatric Oppression is held at the University of Detroit.  (held annually until 1985).

1973    Due to new clinical information and political pressure from the National Gay Task Force, the American Psychiatric Association changes the diagnosis of homosexuality from a disease to a condition that can be considered a disease only when subjectively disturbing to the individual.    The Board of Trustees (BOT) of the APA approves the deletion of homosexuality from the DSM-II and substitutes a diagnosis of “Sexual Orientation Disturbance”.   
       
1973    "Homosexuality" is removed from the DSM as a diagnosis in part due to the efforts of protests from the movements.    
   
1973    Lesbian Nation. by Jill Johnston.   
   
1973    I Came to My Island: A Journey Through the Experience of Change. by Hanna Bauer.
   
1974    Second Conference on Human Rights and Psychiatric Oppression held in Topeka, Kansas.  It was the first time it was run by psychiatric survivors.   

1974    Every Day Gets a Little Closer:  A Twice-Told Therapy. by I. Yalon and Ginny Elkin.
       
1974    W-3. by Bette Howland.   
   
1974    Retreat From Sanity. by M. B. Bowers.   

1974    “Visions of a Madman,” Madness Network News Reader. by P.G. Harrison. (eds. S. Hirsh, J. K. Adams, & L.R. Frank).   
   
1974    Referendum organized by antigay psychoanalysts to overturn APA BOT decision is defeated.   APA members support BOT decision to remove homosexuality by significant majority.   

1974    Wade Blank founded the Atlantis Community in Denver, Colorado, a model for community-based, consumer-controlled, independent living. The Atlantis Community provided personal assistance services primarily under the control of the consumer within a community setting.   
   
1974    These Are My Sisters. An "Insandectomy." Tulsa, OK: Vickers, 1947 (reprint) by Lara Jefferson (pseudonym).   
   
1974    Hurry Tomorrow a documentary on involuntary treatment at metropolitan state hospital filmed by Richard Cohen and Kevin Rafferty premiered as a benefit for NAPA, Network Against Psychiatric Assualt  to overflow audiences at the Clay Theatre in San Francisco.   Additional screenings continue at other theaters.   

1974    Madness Network News Reader.  San Fransisco, CA: Glide Publications.
   
1974    Special issue—“What It’s Like—From the Receiving End.” Mind Out. by Anonymous.   
   
1974    Sketchbook From Hell. by Edward Dixon Garner.

1974    A Quest for Justice:  My Confinement in Two Institutions. by Bertrand Wilson.
   
1974    Second Conference on Human Rights and Psychiatric Oppreassion held in Topeka, Kansas.  It was the first time it was run by psychiatric survivors.

1974    Being Different: The Autobiography of Jane Fry. by Jane Fry.   

1974    “Ordeal in a Mental Hospital.” The Radical Therapist. by Anonymous.
           
1975    Road to Love: An Autobiography. by John Harrison Farmer.

1975    The Far Side of Despair—A Personal Account of Depression. by Russell K. Hampton.
       
1975    NAPA in Los Angeles is formed after theatrical screenings of Hurry Tomorrow.  The film is reviewed in the Los Angeles Times "...a crucifying indictment of ward conditions, drug companies and the violations of present laws.  The film is an act of courage and a warning about mind control told with compassion and rage."
   
1975    Time and the Human Robot. by Hope Rogers.   

1975    Too Much Anger, Too Many Tears: A Personal Triumph Over Psychiatry. New York: Quadrangle/ The New York Times Book Co. Gotkin, J. & Gotkin, P.   

1975    Hospital staff and state employees union asks the governor to ban Hurry Tomorrow as reported in the Los Angeles Times.
1975    15 years after being told he was “too disabled to work”, Ed Roberts was appointed as the head of Vocational Rehabilitation for California in, and established 9 CILs in the state.   

1975    Too Much Anger, Too Many Tears: A Personal Triumph over Psychiatry. by Janet Gotkin and Paul Gotkin.   

1975    Education of All Handicapped Children Act (PL 94-142): requires free, appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment possible for children with disabilities. This law is now called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
   
1975    Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights Act: among other things, establishes Protection and Advocacy (P&A) system.   
   
1975    Reality Police: The Experience of Insanity in America. by Anthony Brandt.
   
1975    The U.S. Supreme Court, in O'Connor v. Donaldson, rules that people cannot be institutionalized against their will in a psychiatric hospital unless they are determined to be a threat to themselves or to others.    It is a violation of civil rights to medicate, treat, or hospitalize a person against their will.   
   
1975    The Eden Express. (reprinted in 2002). by Mark Vonnegut.   

1975    Living with Depression—and Winning. by Sarah Fraser.

1975    “How I Conquered Claustrophobia.” Mind Out. by Brigit Barlow.

1975    Addicted to Suicide—A Woman Struggling to Live. by Mary Savage.   

1975    Hurry Tomorrow is screened at international film festivals including Edinburgh, London, Rotterdam, Los Angeles Filmex and wins the Grand Prize at Ann Arbor Film Festival.   
       
1975    Whom the Gods Destroy. by John Neary.   

1975    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. by Ken Kesey.   

1976    Insanity Inside Out. by Kenneth Donaldson.   

1976    Anna. London. by David Reed.   
   
1976    Luisah Teish, an African-American activist,priestess,psychiatric survivor and author co-edited the 1976 Third World Issue of Madness Network News.

1976    First ECT (Electro-Convulsive Therapy) informed consent lawsuit.   
1976    Josh: My Up and Down, In and Out Life. by Joshua Logan.   

1976    Breakdown. by Stuart Sutherland.   
   
1976    The Grigorenko Papers. by P. G. Grigorenko.   

1976    Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry. New York: Basic Books, Szasz, Thomas S.   
   
1976    Governor Brown follows through on his word to NAPA by launching an investigation into the state hospitals that results in uncovering more than a thousand patient deaths in a three year period.  The story makes headlines  both in Los Angeles and California, and nationally.  Hurry Tomorrow is credited with triggering the biggest and continuous news story of that year and is featured on CBS and ABC Evening News.   
       
1976    Hurry Tomorrow is screened at international film festivals including Edinburgh, London, Rotterdam, Los Angeles Filmex and wins the Grand Prize at Ann Arbor Film Festival.   

1976    Midnight Baby-Autobiography. by Basil Hubbard Pollitt.

1976    The Case of Leonid Plyushch (trans. Marie Sapiets). by Leonid Plyushch.
   
1976    NAPA conducts a one day protest against involuntary treatment and slave wages paid to people locked up in state hospitals.  The demonstrators spontaneously decide to occupy the outer office of then Governor Jerry Brown -- they remain there for a month.  There is extensive media coverage and stories throughout California about this extraordinary protest.  On July 4th, some NAPA members and the filmmaker attend a midnight screening of Hurry Tomorrow for Governor Brown, future Governor Gray Davis and Director of Health Jerome Lachner, in Lackner's home -- a few miles from the protest.  After screening the film Governor Brown commits to investigate conditions in California state hospitals -- once the demonstrators depart his office.  Protesters continue an educational campaign for legislative analysts and lawmakers during their month long stay.  The Governor talks to the press about the protest, involuntary treatment and the film.
       
1976    “That Nigger’s Crazy.” Madness Network News, Vol 3:5, March 1976.
Highlights scientific racism from Samuel Cartwright to Shockley and Jenson.  by Teish, Luisa.
       
1976    Horrors of the Half-Known Life. Barker-Benfield, G.J. New York, NY: Harper & Row.
       
1977    Clouds of Fear.  London. by Roger Hall.   

1977    Wander, Wander: A Woman's Journey into Herself. by Dix Never.

1977    NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) initiates a unique but modestly funded demonstration program, the Community Support Program (CSP) to stimulate and assist states and localities in improving opportunities and services in the community for people with a serious mental illness.   
   
1977    U.S. Congress created a National Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research to investigate allegations that psychosurgery — including lobotomy techniques — was used to control minorities and restrain individual rights.   
       
1977    Midnight Express. by B. Hayes (with W. Hoffer).

1977    The Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein and Edmund White.

1977    Project Acceptance is founded (Su Budd, Kansas).

1977    MHCC (Mental Health Consumer Concerns Inc.) is founded Jay Mahler, Contra Costa County, California).   

1977    “My Ambition is to be Dead.” Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 4(3), 66-83. by A. Hurry.   

1977    The Cracker Factory. by Joyce Rebeta-Burditt.   

1977    A Case Between Mentally Sound and Mentally Unsound. by Lai Quek Seng.   

1977    I’m Eve. by Chris Costner Sizemore and Elen Sain Pittillo.

1977    No Longer Lonely. by Pat Ansite.   
   
1977    Mental Patients Rights Association (MPRA), is founded. (Sally Zinman, West Palm Beach, Florida).   

1977    Male model of mental health involves a man’s ability to “own” or be “serviced by” a woman, men who will not or cannot do this (male homosexuals, “schizophrenics”, alcoholics or drug addicts) will be labeled neurotic or psychotic and often hospitalized. The absence of a woman to take care of them despite their lack of masculinity will be associated with longer psychiatric hospital stays.    1

1977    Vermont Liberation Organization is founded (Paul Dorfner).

1977    Maniac: Anatomy of a Mental Illness. by Charles F. Hellmuth.
1978    The final report of President Carter's Commission on Mental health calls for attention to basic community supports for mental health consumers.   

1978    The final report of President Carter's Commission on Mental health calls for attention to basic community supports for mental health consumers.   

1978    On Margate Sands. London. by Bernard Kops.   

1978    Love Comes in Buckets. London. by Katharina Havecamp.

1978    I’m Depressed---Are You Listening Lord? by Peggy Buck.

1978    Mindrape: A Diary of Endogenous Depression. by Frank Emery Sugar.
   
1978    Nine and a Half Weeks. by Elizabeth McNeill.   

1978    To Build a Castle:  My Life as a Dissenter.  London. by V. Bukovskii.   

1978    History of Shock Treatment.  Leonard Roy Frank   

1978    How Not to Kill a Cockroach. by Raya Eksola Tew.

1978    Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act: provides for consumer-controlled centers for independent living.   

1978    On July 5-6, 1978, Wade Blank, founder of ADAPT (1983) and nineteen disabled activists held a public transit bus "hostage" on the corner of Broadway and Colfax in Denver, Colorado. ADAPT (originally American Disabled for Accessible Public Transit and later in 1990, American Disabled for Attendant Programs Today) eventually mushroomed into the nation's first grassroots, disability rights, activist organization.  They used sledge hammers to create the first curb cuts for wheelchairs in the country.   

1978    "On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System" a seminal work and standard text of the psychiatric survivor movement, written by Judi Chamberlin. Published by McGraw Hill.
   
1978    Another World. by Irene Drory.

1978    Shrinking. by Alan Lelchuk.   
       
1978    Brando for Breakfast. by A. K. Brando.   

1978    Italian law 180 prevented the admission of any new cases to long-stay hospitals.
       
1979    From stigma to identity politics: Political activism among the physically disabled and former mental patients. Social Science & Medicine, 13, 65-773. Anspach, R.    

1979    Birdy. by William Wharton.   
   
1979    I’m Dancing As Fast As I  Can. by Barbara Gordon.   

1979    The Anti-Psychiatry Bibliography and Resource Guide.  by Frank K. Portland.
   
1979    “Coping with Schizophrenia.” Mind Out. by Anne.

1979    Strangers No More—Diary of a Schizo. by Joy Larkin.

1979    Life-Time. by Jane Rittmaye.
   
1979    History’s Carnival. by Leonid Plyushch.   

1979    Schizophrenia—the Hell Within. Community Care. by Martha Robinson.        
1980    Congress passes the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA), authorizing the U.S. Justice Department to file civil suits on behalf of residents of institutions whose rights are being violated.

1980    The Mental Health Systems Act of 1980 authorizes expansion of community mental health centers.   
   
1980    The Politics of Ecstasy. Ronin Publishing. Timothy Leary.

1980    Bog-Trotter. by Dory Previn.

1980    Congress passes the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act, authorizing the U.S. Justice Department to file civil suits on behalf of residents of institutions whose rights are being violated.   

1980    The Shoe Leather Treatment: The Inspiring Story of Bill Thomas' Triumphant Nine-Year Fight for Survival in a State Hospital for the Criminally Insane as Told to S. T. Stebel. by S. T. Stebel.

1980    DSM-III creates a new class, the “psychosexual disorders,” including psychosexual dysfunction, paraphilia (fetishism), gender identity disorder (transsexualism), and “ego-dystonic homosexuality.”   




1980    Social Security Amendments, Section 1619 was passed. Designed to address work disincentives within the Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income programs, other provisions mandated a review of Social Security recipients. This led to the termination of benefits of hundreds of thousands of people with disabilities.   
   
1980    “Three essays on patients’ experiences of ECT.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 137, 8-16; 17-25; 26-37. by C. P. L. Freeman, et al.   

1980    Dr. Caligari's Psychiatric Drugs published by the Network Against Psychiatric Assault.   

1980    The Mental Patients Alliance of Central New York (the Mental Patients Liberation Alliance), led by George Ebert, initiates the annual remembrance of Bastille Day (July 14) as a celebration of the human spirit and vigil and demonstration to stop psychiatric oppression.   

1980    Institute of Fools. by Viktor Nekipelov.   

1980    Save Me! A Young Woman's Journey Through Schizophrenia to Health. by Judy Lee.
       
1980    The Long Journey Home. by Carol Ferland.   

1980    National Association for Rights Protection and Advocacy is formed.   

1980    Congress passes the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act, authorizing the U.S. Justice Department to file civil suits on behalf of residents of institutions whose rights are being violated.   

1980    The Mental Health Systems Act of 1980 authorizes expansion of community mental health centers.   

1980    “Three Meetings with Madness,” Mind Out. by David Brandon.   

1980    The APA published a new Diagnostic and Statistics Manual (DSM III), in place of homosexuality was a new diagnosis, "Gender Identity Disorder in Childhood," also known as "Sissy Boy Syndrome."   
   
1980    Social Security Amendments, Section 1619 was passed. Designed to address work disincentives within the Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income programs, other provisions mandated a review of Social Security recipients. This led to the termination of benefits of hundreds of thousands of people with disabilities.
1980    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual has grown to 224 mental disorders in the DSM-III from the 112 mental disorders in its initial, 1952 edition.   
       
1981    Portland Coalition for the Psychiatrically Labeled (PCPL) organized by Sally Clay in Portland, Maine.   
   
1981 “I Can’t Imagine Life Without Mental Illness.” Mind Out. by George.   

1981    P.L. 97-35 Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 created State Mental Health Block Grants.   

1981    The epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and HIV virus infections presents mental health professionals with a series of challenges including: treating patients' symptoms of anxiety and depression and differentiating organic symptoms from symptoms of HIV brain infection.   

1982    Rogers v. Macht (Rogers v. Okin or Rogers v. Commissioner of Mental Health) filed and finally adjudicated in 1982 establishing a limited right to refuse treatment (psychiatric drugs) in Massachusetts.   

1982    Berkley California votes to ban shock treatment after ballot campaign run by psychiatric survivors. Ted Chabasinski organized this.   

1982    Starving for Attention. by Cherry Boone O'Neill.   

1982    Berkley California votes to ban shock treatment after ballot campaign run by psychiatric survivors. Ted Chabasinski organized this.   

1982    Mary Barnes: Two accounts of a journey through madness. Second edition. New York: Penguin Books. Barnes, M. and Berke, J.   

1982    APA establishes the a Caucus of Homosexual-Identified Psychiatrists which later becomes the Caucus of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Psychiatrists.   

1982    Declaration of Principles adopted at the Tenth Annual International Conference on Human Rights and Psychiatric Oppression, held in Toronto, Canada on May l4-l8 1982.   
       
1982    Holiday of Darkness. by Norman S. Endler.  (revised ed., Toronto: Wall & Thompson, 1990).   
       
1982    Berkley California votes to ban shock treatment after ballot campaign run by psychiatric survivors.

1983    Psychiatric Dugs: Hazardas to the Brain.  Petter Breggin, M.D.   
1983    Leaves from Many Seasons:  Selected papers. by O. H. Mowrer.   

1983    The American Medical Society in Alcoholism and Drug Dependence is formed.  Its creation is the result of efforts to combine several professional medical organizations under the auspices of a single entity for physicians interested in chemical dependency.   

1983    “The manufacture of madness: An interview with Samuel Delany.” Pheonix Rising: The voice of the psychiatrized. Fall 1983. Volume 4, Number 2.  Markman, A.

1983    "Schizophrenia: Exploding the Myth". Phoenix Rising 3:3, 1983. Weitz, Don.
       
1983     “Life in an Insane Asylum.” Overland Monthly. 13:161-171. by Charles Coyle.

1983    California Network of Mental Health Clients founded. Sally Zinman, among the 21 member founding Steering Committee, was its part time Coordinator for the first year of its existence and then later Executive Director from 1997 -2007.    

1983    The Words to Say It. by Marie Cardinal.   

1983    A national monthly teleconference of people with psychiatric histories is established.  It ran for over two years with hundreds of people and 28 locations.  Participants include movement leaders from around the United States.   

1983    Mental Patients Alliance of Central New York is incorporated doing business as the Mental Patients Liberation Alliance.   
   
1983    Am I Still Visible? A Woman’s Triumph over Anorexia Nervosa. by Sandra Harvey Heater.   
   
1984    An Angel at My Table: An Autobiography. by Janet Frame.

1984    Afraid of Everything:  A Personal History of Agoraphobia. by D. M. Woods.
   
1984     To be a Mental Patient written by Rae Unzicker.

1984    I Speak for the Silent. UK. by Alexandra [Messenger].   

1984    A Private Practice. by Patrick Reilly.   

1984    Early efforts to involve consumers in research include the People FIrst study in California (1984) and the Hill House Project in Ohio (published 1990).

1984    Mollie Fancher: The Brooklyn Enigma. An Authentic Statement of Facts in the Life of Mary J. Fancher. The Psychological Marvel of the Nineteenth Century. by Abram H. Dailey.
1984    Congress passed the 1984 National Minimum Drinking Age Act that persuaded states to raise the minimum age from 18 to 21 for the purchase and possession of alcohol.   

1984    Congress passed the 1984 National Minimum Drinking Age Act that persuaded states to raise the minimum age from 18 to 21 for the purchase and possession of alcohol.   

1984    Committee for Truth in Psychiatry (CTIP), a national organization of survivors of electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), founded by Marilyn Rice, directed by Linda Andre.   

1984    National Mental Health Consumers' Self-Help Clearing House is founded by Joseph Rogers as a division of Project SHARE (Self-Help and Advocacy Resource Exchange), a consumer organization based at the Mental Health Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania.   
   
1984    Home From Seven North. by M. Thomas.   

1984    Congress appropriated funds in 1984 for the Child and Adolescent Service System Program (CASSP), envisioned as a comprehensive mental health system designed for children, adolescents and their families. These are known as the CASSP Principles.   
   
1985    Snowblind. London. by Cherry Smith.

1985    Jambalaya:The Natural Woman’s Book of Personal Charms and Practical Rituals. San Francisco: Harper and Row, Teish, Luisah   

1985    Baltimore, Maryland “Alternatives”    On Our Own of Maryland
Alternatives: Getting Organized.

1985    National Institute of Mental Health issues a Request for proposals for consumer-run national technical assistance centers.   

1985    First annual Alternatives conference - Alternatives '85 - organized by On Our Own of Maryland.   
   
1985    Rappaport in a keynote address to the third annual meeting of the New York City Self-Help Clearinghouse defined empowerment.   

1985    The last International Conference on Human Rights and Against Psychiatric Oppression is held.   
   
1985    Second Step Players began. It is the oldest peer run theater group in the United States.   
1985    Mind/World Federation for Mental Health Congress in Brighton - the
first time UK survivors met groups of activists from other countries.   

1985    Born a Number. London. by Len Harding.   

1985    Mental Illness Bill of Rights Act: requires protection and advocacy services (P&A) for people with mental illness.   

1985    Two national organizations are born: the National Mental Health Consumers' Association and the National Alliance (or Association?) of Mental Patients, later renamed the National Alliance (or Association) of Psychiatric Survivors.  Both groups are now defunct. 
Fellowship Farm, Pottstown, PA (See National Coalition of Mental Health Consumer/Survivor Organizations)

1985    Thinking in Pictures, and Other Reports from My Life with Autism. by Temple Grandin.   
       
1985    Collaborative Support Programs of New Jersey (CSPNJ), directed by Jack Bucher, began providing peer delivered and managed services.    

NAMI client council was formed in 1988.  Same year Tom Posey of Montana was elected the first "consumer" to the NAMI board of directors at their annual conference in Boulder, Colorado.  Today it is called the NAMI Consumer Council.  One of the Council’s subcommittees works to eliminate seclusion and restraint.     1985-01-01 00:00:00 -0500       

1985    National Institute of Mental Health issues a Request for proposals for consumer-run national technical assistance centers.   

1985    Survivor-run conference replaced by NIMH funded "Alternatives" conference . . . An alternative to an independent movement.

1985    Madness Network News ceases publication.

1985    Establishment of the Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists   

1985    CSPNJ received funding from the NJ Division of Mental Health and Hospitals to fund three Consumer-run Drop-In Centers.   

1985    Protest at the Philadelphia Housing Authority to get them to change discriminatory policy related to CSX folks having to have a note from their psychiatrist to be granted housing.  Joe Rogers, Susan Rogers, Glenda Fine, Alicia Christian and I - chained ourselves to their front door and driveway gate.     

1986    Incorporation of originating nonprofit project with start-up funding from Levinson Foundation. The goal is to publish a newsletter, Dendron, and provide a "Clearinghouse on Human Rights and Psychiatry," to help network mental health consumers, psychiatric survivors, and supporters.   

1986    CONTAC, in West Virginia, third consumer run technical assistance center by NIMH, headed by Larry Belcher and Kathy Muscari.

1986    Nottingham Patients Council Support Group,  which became Nottingham
Advocacy Group (NAG).   

1986    National Empowerment Center and National Mental Health Consumers' Clearinghouse receive funding from National Institute of Mental Health Community Support Program.
   
1986    Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 increased sentences and re-imposed mandatory minimums. Judges are required to impose minimum sentences based on the type and quantity of drug involved.   

1986    Plaintext: Essays. by Nancy Mairs.   

1986    The first group of psychiatric survivor/consumers trained to work for the mental health system as professionals were trained in Denver, Colorado as Consumer Case Manager Aides (CCMA's)(Pat Risser).  These "peer providers" were the first to provide services that were billable to Medicaid under the Medicaid Rehabilitation Option Waiver in effect for Colorado.    

1986    Following numerous reports of abuse and neglect in state psychiatric hospitals and inadequate safeguards of patient rights, Congress passed the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI) Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-319; 42 U.S.C. 10801 et seq). This Act was modeled after the DD (Developmentally Disabled) Act and extended similar protections to persons with mental illness who reside in facilities. The Act was designed to set up protection and advocacy agencies for people who were in-patients or residents of mental health facilities.   

1986    National Voices Forum established.

1986    Survivors Speak Out formed - the first national  UK networking & campaigning group.

1986    The Life of a Real Girl. by Johanna Garfield.   

1986    CSPNJ supported the development of the coalition of Mental Health Consumers Organizations (COMHCO), which advocates on behalf of mental health consumers to enhance and strengthen services provided by the Division of Mental Health Services.
1986    Incorporation of originating nonprofit project with start-up funding from Levinson Foundation. The goal is to publish a newsletter, Dendron, and provide a "Clearinghouse on Human Rights and Psychiatry," to help network mental health consumers, psychiatric survivors, and supporters.   

1986    Nancy Reagan introduces her "Just Say No" anti-drug campaign and the Office of Substance Abuse Prevention (OSAP) was created.   
   
1986    The State Mental Health Planning Act of 1986 requires stakeholder involvement in the State Block Grant program.   

1986    Cincinnati, Ohio W.E. C.A.R.E. Network  Unlocking Our Future.   

1986    Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1986 defined supported employment as a "legitimate rehabilitation outcome."   

1986    36,000 teens admitted in psychiatric hospitals many as a reaction to report of child sexual abuse for treatment - on an involuntary status.   

1986    Nancy Reagan introduces her "Just Say No" anti-drug campaign and the Office of Substance Abuse Prevention (OSAP) was created.   

1986    The American Medical Society on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependence is formed. Its creation is the result of efforts to combine several professional medical organizations under the auspices of a single entity for physicians interested in chemical dependency.   

1986    Showing on national TV of 'We're Not Mad, We're  Angry', a programme
made by survivors.   

1986    After considerable deliberations the Board decided in the end of 1986 to restructure the organization and give control to consumers.  The newly consumer controlled board altered the bylaws and CSPNJ became a statewide consumer run provider agency that would act as an umbrella for consumer service initiatives throughout New Jersey.  CSPNJ currently operates 22 Self-help Centers, Supportive Housing Services, a R & W Training Institute, financial support services, property management and partnerships with the NJ Division of Mental Health Services in providing a growing # of peer delivered services within state psychiatric hospitals.      


1986    Howie the Harp founds the Oakland Independence Support Center.

1986    Federal Analogue Act created a new legal definition of "analog" and placed analogs of a controlled substance into the same schedule as that substance.


1986    Public Law 99-660 (The Healthcare Quality Improvement Act of 1986), and continuing through Public Law 101-639 (1990), Public Law 102-321 (1992), and Public Law 106-310 (2000), where the federal government mandated mental health planning as a condition for receipt of federal mental health block grant funds and mandated participation by stakeholder groups, including people living with mental illness and their families, in the planning process. P.L. 99-660 also mandated, "the provision of case management services to each chronically mentally ill individual in the states who receives substantial amounts of public funds or services."   

1987    When Rabbit Howls: The Troops for Trudi Chase. by Trudi Chase (introduction and epilogue by R. A. Phillips).

1987    The Vermont longitudinal study of persons with severe mental illness, II: Long-term outcome of subjects who retrospectively met DSM-III criteria for schizophrenia. American Journal of Psychiatry, 144, 727-735. by Harding, C., Brooks, G., Ashikaga, T., Strauss, J., and Breier, A   

1987    A movement began to include the parents of children diagnosed as Seriously Emotionally Disturbed (SED) in policy and program planning in an effort to add a family prospective to children’s mental health services.  Studies were initiated and mental health professionals began to explore the role of families in the care of their children with emotional or behavioral disorders.   

1987    First lawsuit against a shock machine manufacturer.    

1987    The Edale Conference, organised by Survivors  Speak Out, which produced a charter of needs and demands that became a  campaigning tool.   

1987    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual has grown to 253 mental disorders in the DSM-III-R from the 112 mental disorders in its initial, 1952 edition.   

1987    SCCORE (Statewide Consumers of Colorado On the Rise for Empowerment) founded by Pat Risser.   

1987    Eli Lilly introduces Prozac.  Within 20 years antidepressants become the most commonly prescribed class of drug in the U.S.   

1987    Reaching across: Mental health clients helping each other (2nd ed.). by Howie the Harp, Sue Budd, and Sally Zinman.   

1987    Saying ‘No’ to Psychiatry. Progressive, 51, 17-17. by M. Schultz.   

1987    Welcome Silence: My Triumph over Schizophrenia. by Carol S. North.
   
1987    Dendron News first published in January.


1987    DSM-III-Revised deletes the diagnosis of homosexuality entirely, leaving the paraphilias and sexual dysfunctions as the two main classes of "sexual disorders"   

1987    Texas Network of Mental Health Consumers (now Texas Mental Health Consumers (TMHC) was created.   

1987    Saying ‘No’ to Psychiatry. Progressive, 51, 17-17. Schultz, M   

1987    The Charlston Morbidity Scale is published. Charlson ME, Pompei P, Ales KL, McKenzie CR (1987). A new method of classifying prognostic comorbidity in longitudinal studies: development and validation. J Chron Dis, 40(5): 373-383.   

1987    Call Me Anna: The Autobiography of Patty Duke. by Patty Duke (with K. Turan).   
       
1987    Justin Dart, Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration, was forced to resign after he testified to Congress that “an inflexible federal system, like the society it represents, still contains a significant portion of individuals who have not yet overcome obsolete, paternalistic attitudes toward disability…”   

1987    INTERVOICE is formed and has grown into an international network with 14 participating countries.   

1987    Dr. Caligari's Psychiatric Drugs. Berkeley, CA: Network Against Psychiatric Assault. Richman, D., Frank, L., & Mandler, A.   

1987    The serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine (Prozac ®), paroxetine (Paxil ®), and sertraline (Zoloft ®) are developed by several American pharmaceutical companies to treat  depression.   

1987    Huntington, West Virginia WV Mental Health Consumers’ Association Supporting the Grass Roots Self-Help Movement.   

1987    Pennsylvanial Mental Health Consumers' Association was established.

1987    On December 7, 1987, a press conference was held to announce the closure of the Philadelphia State Hospital. The hospital officially closed in June of 1990.  Joseph Rogers was a key member of the Coalition for the Responsible Closing of Philadelphia State Hospital, which worked successfully to get the state hospital dollars to follow the patients into the community, establishing a model system of community-based services.   

1988    Seaview Times of South Beach Psychiatric Center. Adolescent Unit. Edited by the "Patients".    
1988    Community Support Program (CSP) of the National Institute of Mental Health funds local consumer-operated Services Demonstration Projects from 1988 - 1991.

1988 Housing Amendments Act:  prohibits discrimination in housing against people with disabilities and families with children   

1988    A Social History of Madness: The World through the Eyes of the Insane.  by Roy Porter.

1988    Alternatives held in Salt Lake City, Utah, sponsored by U-CAN-DU.  The theme:  Working Together.

1988    Housing Amendments Act:  prohibits discrimination in housing against people with disabilities and families with children.   

1988    The Mental Health Empowerment Project started doing business as Mental Health Recipient's Empowerment Project and later to the current name, Mental Health Empowerment Project.   

1988    "100 Years Of ‘Just Say No' Versus ‘Just Say Know'". Evaluation Review. 1988; 22(1):15-45 Beck, J.   

1988    President George H. Bush creates the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy to determine policies and priorities for the Nation's drug control programs.   

1988    Getting Better: Inside Alcoholics Anonymous. by N. Robertson.

1988    When the Spirits Come Back.  Toronto. by Janet O. Dallett.   

1988    Civil Rights Restoration Act: counteracts bad case law by clarifying Congress' original intention that under the Rehabilitation Act, discrimination in ANY program or service that is a part of an entity receiving federal funding -- not just the part which actually and directly receives the funding -- is illegal.  Congress has to override President Ronald Reagan's veto of this legislation.   

1988    Office of National Drug Control Policy created by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. The head of the ONDCP is the "drug czar", a cabinet level position.   

1988    Keeping Secrets. by S. Somers.   

1988    Father Have I Kept My Promise?  Madness as Seen from Within. E. Weisskopf-Joelson (editor).   

1988    Not Always on a Level. Cambridge. by Moran E. J. Campbell,.   
1988    President George H. Bush creates the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy to determine policies and priorities for the Nation's drug control programs.       
1988    First Office of Consumer Affairs in a state mental health agency, directed by David Hilton in New Hampshire.   

1988    Recovery; The lived experience or rehabilitation. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal 11(4), p.11-19. Pat Deegan.   

1988    Nervous Conditions. London. Tsitsi Dangarembga.   

1988    CSPNJ developed the agency’s first supported housing plan and leased our first supportive house in Asbury Park on January 1, 1989.   

1988    Dietary Supplements Act broadened the definition of "dietary supplements" (as distinguished from "foods" and "drugs") and significantly lessened FDA control over them.   
   
1988    Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 replaced the term "recreational use" with "abuse" in the federal vocabulary. Strengthened ability to confiscate property in drug-related crimes. Re-instated the death penalty for traffickers.    

1988    "Manufacturing Madness: How Psychiatric Institutions Drive You Insane." Canadian Dimension, June 1988, 16-21. Weitz, Don.   

1988    The original version of the American's with Disabilities Act (ADA) is introduced to Congress.   
   
1989    Mouth: The Voice of Disability Rights began publication in Rochester, New York.   

1989    John Kane, an American psychiatrist, demonstrates that clozapine is efficacious in schizophrenic patients who are refractory to treatment with other antipsychotic drugs; the FDA approves the drug in 1989.   

1989    Mary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey Through Madness. by Mary Barnes and Joseph Berke. (reprinted 2002).   
   
1989    Talking back: Thinking feminist, thinking black. Boston: South End Press. by belle hooks.
   
1989    More than a thousand attendees of Alternatives '89, in Columbia, SC, passed a resolution demanding a ban on forced electroconvulsive treatment and calling for truly informed consent om ECT and creation of a alternatives to ECT.

1989    Resident patients in state and county hospitals in the U.S. drops below 100,000.
1989    Understanding Race, Ethnicity and Power: The Key to Efficacy in Clinical Practice. New York: The Free Press. Pinderhughes, Elaine.   

1989    Katherine, It’s Time: An Incredible Journey into the World of a Multiple Personality. by Kit Castle and S. Bechtel.   

1989    The Well-Being Scale is developed (Campbell and Schraiber).

1989    On my own: A personal journey through madness and re-emergence. Psychological Rehabilitation Journal 13, p.70-77 by Rae Unzicker.   

1989    Emergency Messages: An Autobiographical Miscellany. by C. Solomon (editor J. Tytell).   
       
1989    Mental health consumer participation on boards and committees: Barriers and strategies. Canada’s Mental Health, June, 8-11. by M. B. Valentine and P. Capponi.
       
1989    The Well Being Project (Campbell & Schraiber, 1989, Campbell, 1992) added to understanding the concept of quality of life from the perspectives of consumers.

1989    Both the federal and state governments offered funding and the Mental Health Association in New York State received a grant to hire a parent of a child with behavioral and emotional difficulties for the purpose of connecting parents of these special needs children to others across the state and to develop a newsletter to access the needs of these families.  The Parent Support Network was formed in New York.   

1989    A Mind of My Own. by Chris Costner Sizemore and Elen Sain Pittillo.   

1989    Alternatives held in Columbia, South Carolina sponsored by South Carolina SHARE.   

1989    “On My Own: A Personal Journey Through Madness and Re-Emergence.”Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal.  13: 71-77. by Rae Unzicker.    

1989    Something Sacred: Conversations, Writings, Paintings.  London. by Mary Barnes (with Ann Scott).   

1990    Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness. by William Styron.   

1990    The ex-patients’ movement: Where we’ve been and where we are going. The Journal of Mind and Behavior, 11:323-336.  Chamberlin, J.   

1990    Several hundred people mark Bastille Day with a march and rally organized by the National Mental Health Consumers' Clearing House at Alternatives '90 in Pittsburgh, PA.   
1990    The ex-patients’ movement: Where we’ve been and where we are going. The Journal of Mind and Behavior, 11:323-336. by Judi Chamberlin.   

1990    Spirit breaking: When the helping professions hurt. The Humanistic Psychologist, 18, 301-313. by Pat Deegan.   

1990    As for the Sky, Falling: A Critical Look at Psychiatry and Suffering. Toronto. by Lynne Shelagh Supeene.   
       
1990    Support Coalition International (SCI) (now called MindFreedom) founded in May. Publication Dendron sponsors a several-day international counter-conference and protest of American Psychiatric Association in New York City called a "Support-In."  At end of counter-conference, 13 initial sponsoring groups form a new coalition. Mental Patients Liberation Alliance in Syracuse, New York provides organizational and fiscal sponsorship.
   
1990    CSPNJ supported the development of GROW Self-Help Mutual Aid Groups for mental health consumers in New Jersey.   

1990    At end of counter-conference with Support Coalition International, 13 initial sponsoring groups form a new coalition. Mental Patients Liberation Alliance in Syracuse, New York provides organizational and fiscal sponsorship.        

1990    Spirit breaking: When the helping professions hurt. The Humanistic Psychologist, 18, 301-313. by Patricia Deegan.   
   
The Loony-Bin Trip. by Kate Millett.   
   
1990    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is signed by President George Bush on 26 July.  It protects the civil rights of people with disabilities, and gives some protection to people with mental illness by stating, "services and supports must be provided in the most integrated setting appropriate to the individual" thus advocating for community placement for people. Closely modeled after the Civil Rights Act and Section 504, the law was the most sweeping disability rights legislation in history. It mandated that local, state and federal governments and programs be accessible, that businesses with more than 15 employees make “reasonable accommodations” for disabled workers and that public accommodations such as restaurants and stores make “reasonable modifications” to ensure access for disabled members of the public. The act also mandated access in public transportation, communication, and in other areas of public life. Joseph Rogers served on the Congressional Task Force on the Rights and Empowerment of Americans with Disabilities, which worked on getting the ADA passed.   
       
1990    Now You Know. by Kitty Dukakis (with J. Srovell).   

1990    Altered States of the Arts - a nationwide network of mental health consumers and survivors whose mission is to promote the arts as a vehicle for social change, personal empowerment and employment - was founded by Gayle Bluebird, Howie the Harp, Dianne Cote and Sally Clay. and other movement leaders at Alternatives in Pittsburgh.   

1990    APA issues position statement opposing discrimination against gay people in the military.   

1990    My Experiences With Clinical Depression. bu G. F. Mundfrom.   

1990    Since the 1990s 44 state psychiatric hospitals were closed.   

1990    Publication Dendron sponsors a several-day international counter-conference and protest of American Psychiatric Association in New York City called a "Support-In."    
1990    The ex-patients' movement: Where we've been and where we're going. The Journal of Mind and Behavior, 11, 323-336. by Judi Chamberlin.   

1990    The Hearing Voices Network established.   

1990    Alternatives held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania sponsored by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse (Clearinghouse).  Theme: Together, Tearing Down the Walls.   

1990    Crazy Women: Madness, Myth, and Metaphor" video available through NARPA.

1990    Philadelphia State Hospital officially closed in June of 1990.   

1991    American Psychoanalytic Association issues position statement opposing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the selection of psychoanalytic candidates.   

1991    The World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (WNUSP), originally founded as the World Federation of Psychiatric Users (WFPU).   

1991    "Alternatives '91" conference in Berkeley draws over 2,000 participants for the largest consumer/survivor conference ever. Howie The Harp calls this the largest voluntary gathering of mental patients in the known galaxy. It was also the last time the Alternatives conference was held on a college campus.   

1991    At Alternatives '91 the first juried Talent Showcase was produced by Altered States of the Arts and emceed by Howie the Harp.   

1991    Nobody’s Child. by M.Balter and R. Katz.   
1991    Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality. by Joan F. Casey and Lynn Wilson.   

1991    Racism and Psychiatry. New York: Carol Publishing Group.  Thomas, Alexander and Samuel Sillen.   

1991    Survivors Poetry set up in London to run  workshops and performances,
which spread to many other cities.   

1991    PEOPLe: Projects to Empower and Organize the Psychiatrically Labeled (Sally Clay, Poughkeepsie, NY)

1991    Sandy Stone’s “Posttranssexual Manifesto”.   

1991    Black Psychology (3rd Edition). Berkeley, CA: Cobb and Henry Publishers. Jones, Reginald L, ed.   

1991    American Psychoanalytic Association issues position statement opposing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the selection of psychoanalytic candidates   

1991    Toxic Psychiatry. New York: St. Martin’s Press. Peter Breggin.   

1991    The Myth of Psychology.  Fred Newman.   

1991    In New York State The Office of Mental Health received a grant to develop an individualized care approach to serving children and families.  Five parents were hired as regional parent advisors. 

1991    Ginny Wood, as Director of the Parent Support Network, assembled a steering committee of 10 parents, including the five Office of Mental Health Regional parent advisors, to develop a Statewide parent support organization.  A mission statement and by-laws were developed for the newly named organization – Families Together in New York State.   

1991    The Breathless Orgasm. by John Money, Gordon Wainwright, and David Hingsburger.      

1991    Alternatives held in Berkeley, California sponsored by West Coast Coalition Unifying through Diversity, Empowering with Dignity.    

1991    At Alternatives '91 in Berkeley, The Fruits and Nuts was conceived.and our mission established in '92's Alternatives in Philly.

 
1992    Client/Practitioners offer both insights.  Darby Penney OMH News.   

1992    Judi Chamberlin, Pat Deegan and Dan Fisher found the National Empowerment Center, Lawrence, MA, with assistance from a TA grant by CSP, NIMH.  

1992    Humanizing the recovery process. Resources, 4(1). 7-8 by Dan Fisher

1992    The Independent Living Movement and people with psychiatric disabilities: Taking back control over our own lives. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal, 15, 3-19. Deegan, P.    

1992    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) established by Congress under the ADAMHA (Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration) Reorganization Act, Public Law 102-321 on October 1, 1992. SAMHSA includes CMHS (Center for Mental Health Services).   

1992    Alternatives held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Power Through Sharing and Knowledge.   

1992    National Artists for Mental Health (Frank Marquit, Hudson,New York).   

1992    Reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act: provides for greater consumer control through the development of Statewide Independent Living Councils (SILC's).  Title I presumption of eligibility and 60-day eligibility determination period.  Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act were infused with the philosophy of independent living.   

1992    New York State OMH appoints first Office of Consumer Affairs (Darby Penney)   

1992    Youth Empowerment Association! (YEA!) in New York State is created.   

1992    Consumer/Survivor Mental Health Research and Policy Work Group Task Force, Focus groups on outcome measures/client outcomes. Fort Lauderdale, FL   

1992    Judi Chamberlin was awarded the Distinguished Service Award of the President of the United States by the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities.

1992    CMHS had an annual CSP conference and probably 50-60 consumer reps
walked out of the 2nd day of the conference, marched to the CMHS office and
demanded a meeting with Bernie Arons about lack of consumer/survivor input
into the conference... and were granted a meeting.   

1992    Upstairs in the Crazy House: The Life of a Psychiatric Survivor. Toronto. by Pat Capponi.   

1992    National Association of Consumer/Survivor Mental Health Administrators (NAC/SMHA) is founded.   

1992    Westchester Youth Forum in New York State opens its doors.   
National Artists for Mental Health (Frank Marquit, Hudson,New York).   
1992    Client/Practitioners offer both insights.  Darby Penney OMH News.

1992    Consumer/Survivor Mental Health Research and Policy Work Group Task Force Reports, (June, July, September) identify recovery, personhood, well-being and liberty as valued outcomes that are not usually measured or operationalized in traditional mental health research or program evaluations.   

1992    American Psychoanalytic Association modifies position statement opposing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation to include faculty, supervising and training analysts.

1992    A Brilliant Madness: Living with Manic-Depressive Illness. by Patty Duke (with Gloria Hochman).   

1992    The UK Advocacy Network (UKAN) established to  bring together survivor groups engaged in advocacy.

1992    A  report by the Royal College of Psychiatrists in Britain on ECT states, 21% of surveyed psychiatrists reported "long term side-effects and risks of brain damage, memory loss [and] intellectual impairment."    

1992    PEER Center (formed by a coalition of peer advocates, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

1992    The first meeting of the People of Color Caucus was held, at Alternative '92 in Philadelphia.  The organization is now known as the American Association of People of Color Mental Health Consumers.   

1992    President George H. Bush signs the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration Reauthorization Act creating the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).   

1992    CSPNJ partnered with Monarch Housing Association in order to purchase consumer supportive housing throughout New Jersey.   

1992    Consumer/Survivor Mental Health Research and Policy Work Group Task Force, Focus groups on outcome measures/client outcomes. Fort Lauderdale, FL   

1992    Murdered Heiress, Living Witness. by P. Wagner.   

1992    Nobody Nowhere:  The Extraordinary Autobiography of an Autistic. by Donna Williams.   

1992    The US network established, a national survivor  network in Wales.   

1992    You Must Be Dreaming. b Barbara Noel.   
1992    The Independent Living Movement and people with psychiatric disabilities: Taking back control over our own lives. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal, 15, 3-19. Deegan, P.    
   
1992    CSPNJ developed Supportive Services program, to augment our support services program for our residents, with assistance from the National Institute for Mental Health’s Service System Improvement Grant.   

1992    Beyond Therapy, beyond science: a new model for healing the whole person. by Anne Wilson. San Francisco, CA: Harper San Francisco,   

1992    Miss Altered States debuted at Alternatives '92 at the Adams Mark Hotel in Philadelphia, PA.   

1993    New York: Community Access hires Howie The Harp as Director of Advocacy. New York City Recipients' Coalition, Peer Specialist Training Center.   
   
1993    CSPNJ initiated Butterfly Property Management (BPM) to serve as the not-for-profit to serve as CSPNJ’s property management organization for our multiple supportive housing properties, offices, and self-help centers.   

Recovering our sense of value after being labeled. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 31, 7-11. by Patricia Deegan.

1993    Madness, heresy and the rumor of angels: The revolt against the mental health system. Chicago: Open Court Press. Farber, S.   

1993    Consumer-practitioners and psychiatrists share insights about recovery and coping. Disability Studies Quarterly 13(2), p, 17-20. Blanch, A., Fisher, D., Tucker, W., Walsh, D. and J. Chassman.
   
1993    From lab rat to researcher: The history, models, and policy implications of consumer/survivor involvement in research. Paper presented at the fourth annual national conference of state mental health agency services research and program evaluation, Annapolis, MD. by Jean Campbell, Ruth Ralph, and Robert Glover.   

1993    Touched with fire: Manic-depressive illness and the artistic temperament. New York: Free Press Paperbacks. Jamison, K. R.   

1993    Picking Up the Pieces:  Two Accounts of a Psychoanalytic Journey. by Fayek Nakhla and Grace Jackson.   
1993    “The Stepladder to the Impossible: A First Hand Phenomenological Account of a Schizoaffective Psychotic Crisis.”  Journal of Mental Health. 2: 239-250.     by Peter K. Chadwick.   

1993    Girl interrupted. New York, NY: Vintage Books. by Kaysen, S.   

1993    Work on creating Nation's first civil service Peer Specialist position begins in New
York State. Celia Brown is named Director of Peer Specialist Services.   

1993    Alternatives held in Columbus, Ohio sponsored by the National Empowerment Center (NEC). A Celebration of Our Spirit.

1993    And They Call it Help; the psychiatric policing of our children. by Louise Armstrong US: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.   

1993    Consumers/survivors reform the system, bringing a ‘human face’ to research. Resources, 5, 3-6. by A. Scott.   

1993    CSPNJ opened our Southern Regional Office in collaboration with the Mental Health Association (MHA) in New Jersey in Pleasantville to develop Supportive Services Program to address the ramifications of the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Hospitals’ 450 Program taking persons out of Ancora Psychiatric Hospital into the community.   

1993    Consumers/survivors reform the system, bringing a ‘human face’ to research. Resources, 5, 3-6. Scott, A.    

1993    Reaching across II: Maintaining our roots: The challenge of growth. by Howie the Harp and Sally Zinman.   

1993    Stopovers on My Way Home from Mars.  London. Mary O'Hagan.   

1993    The National Self-Harm Network  established (UK).   

1993    President Bill Clinton's unsuccessful effort to end discrimination against gays in the military leads to the compromise:   Don't Ask, Don't Tell    

1993    The Patient Build Wall, some of which still stands, on th grounds of Centre for Addiction and Mental Health has been a part of Psychiatric Survivor and Mad Pride annual activities in the City of Toronto since 1993 when Toronto's first Psychiatric Survivor Pride Day hosted by West End Survivors.   

1993    46 State mental health departments funded 567 self-help groups and agencies (NASHMPD).
1993    “Putting their money where their mouths are: SMHA support of consumer and family-run programs.”  Arlington, VA, National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors.
       
1993    The Letter of a Victorian Madwoman. by J. S. Hughes (editor).    

1993    1993-1994 Lakeshore Hospital, Manchester, NH, a psychiatric hospital, was closed.   

1993    Movement leaders met with President Bill Clinton as part of an historic White House dialogue with 28 leaders of major disability constituencies. Among participants were Joseph Rogers and Judi Chamberlin.

1994    The mad among us: A history of the care of America’s mentally ill. New York, NY: The Free Press. by Grob, G.

1994    Murderous Memories: One Woman’s Hellish Battle to Save Herself. by Jean Small Brinson.
       
1994    The writing on the wall: Women’s autobiography and the asylum. by M. E. Wood.   

1994    NY State OMH hires five regional recipient affairs persons.  Mary Auslander is hired for the New York City Field Office.   

1994    Aleternatives is held in Anaheim, sponsored by the California Clearinghouse  Celebrating Ten Years of Alternatives: A Decade of Dignity, Wellness and Unity.   

1994    Women of the Asylum: Voices From Behind the Walls, 1840–1945. New York: Anchor Press. Geller J L, Harris M (eds).

1994    The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness. by Lori Schiller and Amanda Bennett.   

1994    The FDA approves Risperidone.   
   
1994    In Italy, from 1994-1995, laws aimed to accelerate closure of mental hospitals. Laws fined hospitals and local health units if they did not close before the end of 1999.   
   
1994    Somebody Somewhere: Breaking Free from the World of Autism. by Donna Williams.   

1994    MADNESS email list first messages sent.

1994    The first People of Color Conference was held at the Seventh Annual Mental Health Cultural Diversity Conference in Cleveland, Ohio, sponsored by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and co-sponsored by the People of Color Caucus, now known as the American Association of People of Color Mental Health Consumers. The conference was facilitated by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse.
   
1994    Prozac Nation:  Young and Depressed in America. by Elizabeth Wurtzel.   

1994    DSM-IV groups sexual dysfunction, the paraphilias, and gender identity disorder under the heading “sexual and gender identity disorders”.   

1994    The first class of the Consumer Service Training graduates in Contra Costa County, California.  This is the first training for Community Support Workers where the curriculum, class design, and training were all implemented and taught by other consumer/survivors (Pat Risser, Jay Mahler, Mary Carley, etc.) with a recovery orientation.    
       
1994    Empirical Correction of Seven Myths about Schizophrenia with Implications for Treatment. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 90(suppl.384): 140-146. Harding, C. M. and Zahniser, J.M.   

1994    Darby Penney, Celia Brown, Peter Stastny, and Neil Covatta were successful in creating the first civil service Peer Specialist Title in the United States.   

1994    Why the medical model won’t work. Unpublished manuscript. by Sally Clay.   

1994    Rocking the Cradle of Sexual Politics. by Louise Armstrong. US: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.   
   
1994    Why the medical model won’t work. Unpublished manuscript.  by Sally Clay.

1994    The writing on the wall: Women’s autobiography and the asylum. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press. Wood, M. E.   

1994    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual has grown to 374 mental disorders in the DSM-IV from the 112 mental disorders in its initial, 1952 edition.

1994    Undercurrents: A Therapist’s Reckoning with Her Own Depression. by Martha Manninf.   
   
1994    Empowering the Disempowered Ike Powell & Ed Knight   
1994    Something is happening: The contemporary consumer and psychiatric survivor movement in historical context. The Journal of Mind and Behavior, 15, 55-70. by B. Everett.   

1994    The first class of the Consumer Service Training graduates in Contra Costa County, California.  This is the first training for Community Support Workers where the curriculum, class design, and training were all implemented and taught by other consumer/survivors (Pat Risser, Jay Mahler, Mary Carley, etc.) with a recovery orientation.    

1994    Coalition is incorporated on its own as two nonprofits: Support Coalition Northwest (based in Oregon) & Support Coalition International, later merged.
   
1994    Soon Will Come the Light: A View From Inside the Autism Puzzle. by T. A. McKean.   

1994    A Drinking Life: A Memoir. by Pete Hamill.   

1994    C/S/X in New York State negotiate official policy change: OMH adopts goal of
eliminating restraint and seclusion.
   
1995    In Other Words. by Marie Cardinal.

1995    Mental Health Confidence Scale (Carpinello et. al.) (republished in 2000)

1995    Campaigns Against Racist Federal Programs by the Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology.Retrieved 7/8/2000 from http://www.breggin.com/racistfedpol.html Journal of African American Men 1:No. 3, 3-22. Winter 1995/96 Breggin,Peter R.

1995    Phone at Nine Just to Say You’re Alive.  London. by Linda Hart.   

1995    Prairie Reunion. B. J. Scot.   

1995    Peaking Out: How My Mind Broke Free from the Delusions in Psychiatry. by Al Siebert.           

1995    A Shining Affliction: A Story of Harm and Healing in Psychotherapy. by Annie Rogers.   

1995    An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness. by Kay Redfield Jamison.

1995    How to Become a Schizophrenic: The Case Against Biological Psychiatry (2nd ed). Everett, Washington: Apollyon Press. Modrow, J.   

1995    In 1995 President Clinton appoints Rae Unzicker to the National Council on Disability.   

1995    Secret Life: An Autobiography. by Michael Ryan.

1995    The National Mental Health Consumer and Ex-Patient Organizations and Resources (SC SHARE, 1995), all 50 states and the DIstrict of Columbia are represented with 235 different consumer organizations.  There are also 19 national sources from which to obtain self-help information and referral.

1995    Quivers. by Robin Quivers.

1995    Enter Stage Left. Stage 2! Youth Empowerment. (editors Kim Baez and Lauren Tenney).   

1995    ‘Identity Politics’ close to home. American Psychologist. 50, 49-50. by Andrea Blanch and Darby Penney.   

1995    The Managed Care Consortium (MCC) formed in 1955 to create educational opportunities for a host of advocacy organization across the United States.  The MCC, with funding from CMHS, encouraged teams to form in each state to impact the development of managed care programs.

1995    When the Music’s Over: My Journey into Schizophrenia. by R. Burke.  (editors R. Gates & R. Hammond).   

1995    Restraint and Seclusion: The Model for elimination of their use in healthcare" by Maggie Bennington-Davis, MD and Tim Murphy, MS. HCPro.

1995    CMHS hires first Consumer Affairs Specialist.   

1995    Beyond bedlam: Contemporary women psychiatric survivors speak out. Chicago: Third Side Press. Grobe, J.

1995    St. Paul, Minnesota sponsored by the National Empowerment Center Returning to Our Roots: Rights and Renewal.

1995    Folie à Deux: An Experience of One-to-One Therapy.  London. by Rosie Alexander.   

1995    The Beast: A Reckoning with Depression. by Tracy Thompson.

1995    Madness in America: Cultural and Medical Perceptions of Mental Illness before 1914. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, Gamwell, Lynn,and Tomes,Nancy.   


1995    The Youth Empowerment Association! (YEA! ) becomes Stage 2! Youth Empowerment in New York City and is awarded contract to create peer support in state-operated children’s psychiatric centers.   

1995    Diary of a Fat Housewife:  A True Story of Humor, Heartbreak and Hope. by Rosemary Green.   

1995    Justice for All was organized by Justin Dart and others in Washington, D.C.   

1995    How to Become a Schizophrenic: The Case Against Biological Psychiatry (2nd ed). Everett, Washington: Apollyon Press. Modrow, J.   

1995    They Say You’re Crazy. by Paula Caplan. Addison Wesley Publishing Co.

1995    Families Together became an official state organization of the Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health, a national, parent-run organization focused on the needs of children and youth with emotional, behavioral or mental health disorders and their families.   

1995    Howie the Harp (1953-1995) known for his peacemaking and mediating  with words  and music, his harmonica never far away from him.  He was founder of the Oakland Support Center and also of Altered States of the Arts, a national network of artists, writers and performers.

1995    The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) was founded in Washington, D.C.  (Andy Imparato).   

1995    Beyond bedlam: Contemporary women psychiatric survivors speak out. Chicago: Third Side Press. Grobe, J.   

1995    Beyond Bedlam: Contemporary Women Psychiatirc Survivors Speak Out. Jeanine Grobe, editor.   

1995    A memorial was held in New York City for Howie the Harp followed by a march and protest of Involuntary Outpatient Commitment.  Hundreds attend.

1995    The Liar’s Club: A Memoir. by Mary Karr.   

1995    Recovery: The only way to go, The Voice: The Newsletter of the Coalition of Consumer Self-Advocates & Oasis Drop-In Center, Providence. RI. by Emmel, W.

1995    The Day Room: A Memoir of Madness and Mending. by Kathleen Crowley.   

1995    A 1995 survey of ECT patients by the UK Advocacy Network revealed that one-third of 300 patients surveyed believed ECT had damaged them and an astounding 80% claimed it had irreparably destroyed their memory.    

1995    The Cradle will Fall. by Michele G. Remington and Carl S. Burak.

1995    ‘Identity Politics’ close to home. American Psychologist. 50, 49-5 by Andrea Blanch and Darby Penney.   

1995    The Magic Daughter: A Memoir of Living with Multiple Personality Disorder. by J. Phillips.

1995    Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired: Black Women’s Health Activism 1890 -1950. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Smith, Susan L.   

1996    Talking to Angels: A Life Spent at High Latitudes. by Robert Perkins.   

1996    Phantom Illness: Shattering the Myth of Hypochondria. by Carla Cantor (with Brian Fallon).   

1996    Mental health services recipients: Their role in Shaping organizational policy. Administration and Policy in Mental Health, 23, 547-553. by Fisher, W., Penney, D., and Earle, K.    

1996    CSPNJ expanded the number of Self-help Centers to 22. These centers are located across New Jersey in 18 counties.

1996    The Scent of Dried Roses. London. by Tim Lott.

1996    Moonlight,Magnolias and Madness: Insanity in South Carolina from the Colonial
Period to the Progressive Era.Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. McCandless,Peter.   
   
1996    First time a shock machine manufacturer pays money to a survivor.

1996    God Head. by Scott Zwiren.

1996    Surfing the Blues. Sydney, Australia. by Catherine Rzecki.   

1996    Recovery items developed in Canton OH (Ralph, Lambric and Steele)

1996    The National Consumer, Family, and Advocate Leadership Conference on State Mental Health Care Reform and Managed Care was held in Philadelphia.   

1996    Drinking: A Love Story.  by Caroline Knapp.
1996    The Mental Health Parity Act of 1996 passes, barring insurance companies and large self-insured employers from placing annual or lifetime dollar limits on mental health coverage.  This is the first Federal law establishing limited parity for mental health and health care insurance coverage.   

1996    A Message from God in the Atomic Age (trans. Gregory Rabassa). by Irene Vilar.   

1996    Hearing Voices: Resistance Among Psychiatric Survivors and Consumers. Maria Duerr presented this thesis about the history of the psychiatric survivor movement for her Masters Degree in Anthropology at the California Institute of Integral Studies in June.

1996    Sunnybrook: A True Story with Lies. Vancouver. by Persimmon Blackbridge.

1996    In the Jaws of the Black Dogs: A Memoir of Depression. Toronto. by Jon Bentley Mays.

1996    The National Consumer, Family, and Advocate Leadership Conference on State Mental Health Care Reform and Managed Care was held in Philadelphia.   

1996    Mental health services recipients: Their role in Shaping organizational policy. Administration and Policy in Mental Health, 23, 547-553. by W. Fisher, Penney, D. & Earle, K.

1996    CSPNJ opened our Northern Regional Office in collaboration with the MHA in Passaic County to provide support services to consumers being discharged from Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital.   

1996    Recovery as a journey of the heart. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal 19 (3) p. 91-97. by Pat Deegan.
   
1996    Orlando, Florida sponsored by the Clearinghouse Creating Healing Alternatives for Real Health Care Reform.
       
1996    National Consumer, Family and Advocate Leadership Conference on State Mental Health Care Reform and Managed Care, Philadelphia, PA.

1996    Welcome to my Country: A Therapist’s Memoir of Madness. by Lauren Slater.   

1996    According to a report in The Philadelphia Inquirer (“Mentally ill’s safety net found strong,” 5/13/96), the overwhelming majority of those released from Byberry when it closed were subsequently found to be living successfully in the community.

1997    Consumers and Survivors begin restoring state hospital cemeteries in Georgia and Colorado with many states to follow.   

1997    Civil Rights Of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA): Authorizes the U.S. Attorney General to investigate conditions of confinement at state and local government institutions such as prisons, jails, pretrial detention centers, juvenile correctional facilities, publicly operated nursing homes, and institutions for people with psychiatric or developmental disabilities.   

1997    A working definition of empowerment. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 20, 43-46. Chamberlin, J.    

1997    American Psychoanalytic Association becomes first mainstream mental health organization to support marriage equality (same-sex marriage).

1997    WRAP (Wellness Recovery Action Plan) published by Mary Ellen Copeland.   

1997    A consumer-constructed Empowerment Scale to measure empowerment among users of mental health services. Psychiatric Services, 48, 1042-1047. Rogers, E., Chamberlin, J., et al.
   
1997    Memory Slips: A Memoir of Music and Healing. by Linda Katherine Cutting.

1997    Skating to Antarctica. London. by Jenny Diski.   

1997    Recovery and empowerment for people with psychiatric disabilities. Journal of Social Work and Health Care, 25, 11–24. Deegan, P. (1997).

1997    Camarillo State Mental Hospital, Camarillo, CA closed. In use from 1936-1997.

1997    Participatory research and stakeholder involvement in community mental health evaluation and research. Workshop in participatory research, seventh annual conference on state mental health agency services research, program evaluation, and policy, University of Southern Maine. Ralph, R. O.   

1997    Call me crazy: Stories from the mad movement. Vancouver: Press Gang Publishers. Shimrat, I.   
   
"Creating Sanctuary: The Evolution of Sane Societies" by Sandra Bloom, MD. Harcourt.    
   
1997    Prozac Highway. Vancouver,. by Persimmon Backbridge.   

1997    Women and Madness, by Phyllis Chesler. NY, NY: Four Walls Eight Windows.   
1997    Making Us Crazy, DSM-The Psychiatric Bible & Creation of Mental Disorders. Kutchins, Herb & Kirk, Stuart A., NY, NY: The Free Press.   

1998    Centers for Consumer Research & Training instituted, Kentucky Department of Mental Health & Missouri Institute of Mental Health   

1998    Westchester Youth Forum in New York State becomes part of SAMHSA System of Care grant.       

1998    The Center for Mental Health Services funded a cooperative agreement with 8 sites and a coordinating center to study the effects of consumer operated services added to traditional services (GFA 98-04).   

1998    Crisis Hostel Healing Scale (Dumont).

1998    Confessions of a noncompliant patient. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 36, 49-52. by Judi Chamberlin.   

1998    Recovery: the behavioral healthcare guideline of tomorrow. Behavioral Healthcare Tomorrow, June, 1998. Fisher, D.   

1998    Empowerment and women’s mental health services. In B.L. Levin, A. K. Blanch, and A. Jennings (Eds.), Women’s mental health services: A public health perspective (pp. 127-154). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. by Kalinowski, C. and Penney, D.   
   
1998    Recovery: the behavioral healthcare guideline of tomorrow. Behavioral
Healthcare Tomorrow, June, 1998. Fisher, D.   

1998    PACE survivor led report on  gay/lesbian/bisexual experience of mental health services. (UK)
   
1998    Building a Multicultural Research Agenda.   The Mental Health Empowerment Project in Albany, the Center for the Study of Issues in Public Mental Health, and the Hispanic Research Center at Fordham College, in conjunction with members of the New York State Office of Mental Health Multicultural Advisory Committee, have been actively working together to generate a research agenda relevant to Native American, African American, Hispanic and Asian recipient issues.   

1998    Re-Envisioning Family Therapy: Race, Culture and Gender in Clinical Practice. New York: The Guilford Press. McGoldrick, Monica, editor.   

1998    Hartford Courant publishes Pulitzer Prize Winning article on Restraint and Seclusion.    

1998    Centers for Consumer Research & Training instituted, Kentucky Department of Mental Health & Missouri Institute of Mental Health.

1998    Trauma and abuse histories: Connections to diagnosis of mental illness, implications for policy and service delivery. (National Association of Consumer/Survivor Mental Health Administrators, Position Paper, 1-6). by Mary Auslander.   

1998    The War Against Children of Color: Psychiatry Targets Inner City Youth. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press. Breggin,P.R.& Breggin,G.R   

1998    U.S. General Accounting Office initiates investigations on the use of Seclusion and Restraint.  Congressional Hearings are held.    

1998    APA officially criticizes efforts to change sexual orientation.

1998    Recovery Scale (Young and Ensing).   

1999    Soteria and Other Alternatives to Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization: A Personal and Professional Review. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 187:142- 149.    Mosher, L.   
   
1999    Houston, Texas sponsored by CONTAC The New Millenium: Looking Back-Moving Forward.

1999    Your Drug May Be Your Problem. New York: Perseus Publishing. Breggin, P. & Cohen, D.   

1999    New York State Office of Mental Health creates position: Children's Recipient Affairs Specialist and establishes a Statewide Youth Advisory Council.

1999    The Prime Directive Initiative, later to be called the Choice thru Voice Project (2002)  Laura Cisco & Lauren Tenney.  Edited by the Statewide Youth Advisory Council to the New York State Office of Mental Health.    The Prime DIrective Initiative is listed as a best practice in the Roadmap to Seclusion and Restraint Free Mental Health Services. DHHS Pub. No. (SMA) 05-4055. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and other publications.   

1999    Supreme Court rules in Olmstead v. L.C., 527 U.S. 581, that under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), undue institutionalization qualifies as discrimination by reason of disability including people with a mental disability. The Olmstead decision is groundbreaking because it rules that people with disabilities have a right to services in the community outside of institutions.   

1999    Life at the Texas State Lunatic Asylum 1857– 1997. College Station:Texas A&M University Press, Sitton,Sarah C.   





1999    The first National Summit of Mental Health Consumers and Survivors, in August, in Portland, Ore., was organized by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse with the help of the Oregon Office of Consumer Technical Assistance, and co-sponsored by consumer/survivor groups from around the country. Its goal was to develop consensus around the issues of greatest concern to consumers and survivors and create action plans for future work. The unifying principle was the construction of a platform from which the movement could influence national policy.   

1999    “The Labeling Theory of Mental Disorder (II): The Consequences of Labeling.” Pp. 361-376 in A Handbook for the Study of Mental Health, edited by Allan V Teresa L. Scheid. NY, NY: Cambridge University Press. Link, Bruce G. and Jo C. Phelan.
   
1999    Ticket to Work and Work Incentive Improvement Act: Removes barriers that have required people with disabilities to choose between health care coverage and work.  The law also increases consumer choice in obtaining rehabilitation and vocational services through the establishment of a Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program.   

1999    New York State Office of Mental Health creates the Nation’s first known Statewide Youth Advisory Council.  The YAC is comprised of young people who had first-hand experiences of the children’s mental health system.

1999    New York State Office of Mental Health creates position: Children's Recipient Affairs Specialist.   
       
1999    The landmark U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health: A report of the Surgeon General is released and a White House conference on Mental Health is convened.    

1999    Ensuring that people with psychiatric disabilities are the leaders of self-determination and consumer controlled initiatives. Prepared for the National Leadership Summit on Self-Determination and Consumer Direction and Control, Bethesda, MD, October 21-23, 1999. Fisher, D. & Ahern, L   

1999    National Leadership Summit on Self-Determination and Consumer Direction and
Control, Bethesda, MD, October 21-23, 1999.

1999    Reclaim Bedlam campaign, protesting at the celebration of the 750 year anniversary of the UK's first mental hospital, (the original 'Bedlam', now the Maudsley Hospital in London), which led to the  formation of Mad Pride.   

1999    Drink: A Social History of America. Carroll & Graf, 1999. p 321. Barr A.    

1999    The National Council on Disability’s decision to establish a Youth Advisory group was finalized.   
       
1999    The Health Care FInancing Administration (HCFA), currently called the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) publishes an Interim Final Rule on the uses of Seclusion and Restraint in an effort to protect patient's rights - and lives.  The rule states that a doctor or licensed practitioner must, within one hour, do a face-to-face assessment of the person in restraint or seclusion.   

1999    The New York State Office of Mental Health prohibits use of the straightjacket.    
1999    Hillary Clinton, first lady, makes remarks at White House Conference on Mental Health.  Many people from the Consumer, Survivor, and Ex-Patient Movements attend.   

2000    Alternatives 2000 is held in Nashville, Tennessee sponsored by the National Empowerment Center.  Theme: A New Vision of Recovery.

2000    It has to be about Choice.  Journal of Clinical Psychology. Lauren Tenney

2000    Personal Accounts of Consumers/Survivors: Insights and Implications. Diane T. Marsh.

2000    Recovery. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Skills. Ruth Ralph.   

2000    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act allows qualified physicians to dispense and prescribe schedule III, IV or V narcotic drugs or combinations of such drugs approved by the FDA for the treatment of heroin addiction.

2000    Regional Bill N. 561 states that in the Piedmont Region, in accordance with the deliberations of the United Nations, of the European Council and of the Italian Republic in matters of human rights, it is [hereby] forbidden to use ECT on children, the elderly and pregnant women, and if ECT is to be used at all, the psychiatrist in charge must adhere to strict guidelines including supplying both in writing and verbally the possible harmful side effects of the treatment.

2000    Out of her mind. The modern library. Edited by Rebecca Shannonhouse.

2000    Vanessa Jackson first shares In Our OwnVoice at a national c/s/x conference in Nashville,Tennessee.

2000    The long road back. Journal of Clinical Psychology. Kathleen Lynch.

2000    Mad In America: Bad Science, Bad Medicine, and the Enduring Mistreatment of the Mentally Ill. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Perseus Publishing. Whitaker, R.   

2000    Native Perspectives on the Hiawatha Asylum for Insane Indians by Pemina Yellow Bird.

2000    SOCSI (Subcommittee of Consumer/Survivor Issues) is created as a federally supported body to advise the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) National Advisory Council on consumer/survivor perspectives and issues   

2000    Agents, not Objects.  Journal of Clinical Psychology. Ronald Bassman.

2000    Review of recovery literature: A synthesis of a sample of recovery literature. Alexandria, VA: National Technical Assistance Center, Ruth Ralph.   

2000    Lay My Burden Down: Unraveling Suicide and the Mental Health Crisis Among African-Americans. Boston: Beacon Press,2000. Poussaint,M.D.,Alvin,and Alexander, Amy.   
   
2000    SAMHSA funds Children's Welfare League of America 3-year Seclusion/Restraint project for children's residential programs.   

2000    Psychology Practitioners and Schizophrenia: A view from both sides. Journal of Clinical Psychology. Frederick L. Frese III.

2000    What recovery means to us: Consumers’ perspectives. Community Mental Health Journal, 36, 315-328. Mead, S. & Copeland, M.

2000    The Youth Advisory Committee to the National Committee on Disability obtained its charter under the Federal Advisory Committee Act.   

2000    The Highlander Statement of Concern and Call to Action is created.   

2000    The National Council on Disability (NCD) publishes, "From Privileges to Rights: People Labeled with Psychiatric Disabilities Speak for Themselves.   

2000    President Clinton signs the Children's Health Care Act into law establishing national standards that restrict the use of seclusion and restraint in all health facilities.   
   
2000    Mental Health Confidence Scale (Carpinello et. al.)   

2000    APA issues two position statements, one in support of same sex civil unions and the other asking ethical psychiatrists to refrain from practicing conversion or "reparative therapies"   
   
2000    Goldie Marks of Toccoa, Georgia, past president of the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, continues to advocate for herself and other mental health consumers.
   
2000    Committing social change for psychiatric patients: The consumer/survivor movement. Humanity & Society, 24, 389-404. Morrison, L.   
2000    Talking Points: Why Forcing Psychiatric Drugs into Your Home is a Bad Idea. Dendron, 43:20-23. Oaks, D.

2001    The National People of Color of Consumer/Survivors Network, co-founded by
Jacki Mckinney and Celia Brown.   
       
2001    Larry Fricks leads Georgia, first state to make peer specialist services Medicaid-reimbursable on a statewide basis.   
   
2001    Rae Unzicker, one of the founders of NARPA (National for Rights Protection and Advocacy) died in her home in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on March 22, 2001.  She was 52.

2001    Alternatives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania sponsored by the Clearinghouse Freedom to Remember, Freedom to Choose, Freedom to Dream.

2001    During the year 2000, the Family Region Family Support Coalition made the decision to formalize its purpose and mission by becoming a non-profit organization, the Children’s Mental Health Coalition of Western New York.   

2001    Freedom Center is established in Massachusetts   

2001    National Empowerment Center (NEC) (1999). Consumer/Survivor History Project.
http://www.power2u.org/how.html (December 4, 2001).   

2001    In Our Own Voice: African American Stories of Oppression, Survival and Recovery in Mental Health Systems.  Monograph Series.  by Vanessa Jackson.

2001    Charles Curie begins term as SAMHSA administrator.   

2001    "There is marked variability in the nature of ECT practices in community settings. The extent to which this variability impacts on the benefits and risks of ECT needs to be examined." PRUDIC  c1 a1, M.  OLFSON  a1 and H. A.  SACKEIM.  Electro-convulsive therapy practices in the community.
   
2001    Toronto Psychiatric Survivors align with Mad movement via Mindfreedom and hold yearly celebration on July 14, Bastille Day.   

2001    Restorying psychiatric disability: Learning from first person recovery narratives. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 24, 335-343. Ridgway, P.    




2001    Community Enterprises Corporation (CEC) initiated matched savings and asset building programs. Consumers Savings Club (CSC) enables residents to save for short-term financial goals and the Individual Development Account (IDA) program., which is a federal program that enables participants to save for goals such as obtaining a post-secondary education, starting a business, or buying a house.   

2001    The first Survivor Worker's conference in  Manchester. (UK).

2001    The Commonwealth of Virginia House of Delegates approved a resolution expressing regret for its eugenics practices between 1924 and 1979.

2001    CSPNJ initiated a Boarding Home Outreach (BHO) project in select counties throughout New Jersey.

2001    NARPA holds its 20th Annual Rights conference in Niagra Falls, New York.

2001    Salvation: Black People and Love. New York: William Morrow. bell hooks.

2001    Tardive Dyskinesia/Tardive Dystonia National Association: A Beginner's Guide
to Tardive Dyskinesia. Prepared for the 2001 National Association for Rights Protection
and Advocacy (NARPA) Conference, November 1-4, Niagara Falls, NY.    

2001    Beyond Prozac---- Dr.Terry Lynch.
   
2001    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Mental Health: Race, Culture
and Ethnicity ñ A Supplement to Mental Health:  Report of the Surgeon General.
Rockville, Maryland:  U.S. Department of Health and Human Service, Office of the
Surgeon General.    
       
2001    Reaching Across with the Arts,  a self-help arts manual (2001) edited by Gayle Bluebird funded by SAMHSA.   
       
2001    Lunatic Literature: New York State’s The Opal (1851-1860). UMI. by MaryRose Eannace.   

2002    " . . . quality of life depends on a job, a decent place to live, and a date on Saturday night." Charles G. Currie, M.A., A.C.S.W., SAMHSA Administrator.
   
2002    Infusing recovery based principles into mental health services, a white paper by people who are NYS consumers, survivors, patients and ex-patients.

2002    The Law Project for Psychiatric Rights (PsychRights) was incorporated as an Alaska non-profit on November 6, 2002, to undertake a coordinated, strategic, legal effort seeking to end the abuses against people diagnosed with mental illness through individual legal representation.
2002    Liberation by Oppression A comparative study of slavery and psychiatry. Thomas Szasz.

2002    SAMHSA's report to Congress on co-occurring mental and substance use disorders identifies barriers to appropriate treatment and support services and proposes a system in which co-occurring disorders are addressed and treated as primary illnesses.

2002    Justin Dart died, June 22, 2002.   

2002    Icarus Project is established in New York City.

2002    Alternatives in Atlanta, Georgia sponsored by CONTAC.  Theme: Building Partnerships: Strengthening Networks & Taking Action Together.   

2002    Fourty-one states have laws requiring outpatients to follow treatment; involuntary outpatient commitment laws.   
   
2002    American Academy of Pediatrics issues position statement in support of second parent adoptions for same-sex couples; APA follows suit with a similar position statement that same year.   
   
2002    A Personal History of the Consumer Movement by Sally Clay    .

2002    Community Enterprise Corporation CEC, initiated a social enterprise strategy for the purpose of providing permanent, meaningful employment for low-income people with and without disabilities that would provide extensive training and career-development opportunities as well as the ability to progress towards economic self-sufficiency,   

2002    The Law Project for Psychiatric Rights (PsychRights) was incorporated as an Alaska non-profit on November 6, 2002, to undertake a coordinated, strategic, legal effort seeking to end the abuses against people diagnosed with mental illness through individual legal representation.   

2002    Working Cures: Healing, Health and Power on Southern Slave Plantations.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. Fett, C.   

2002    Mad in America: Bad science, bad medicine, and the enduring mistreatment of the mentally ill. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books. by Robert Whitaker.

2002    No Force campaign set up to oppose plans to  extend forced treatment to the community.   
       

2002    Study shows antidepressant pills don’t work much better than placebos.. More than half of the patients on antidepressants improved no more than those on placebos, Kirsch says. “They should have told the American public about this. The drugs have been touted as much more effective than what they are.”  (USA Today, July 8, 2002).   
   
2002    Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice. British Columbia: New Society Publisher. Paul Kivel.

2002    In May a Florida judge orders a developmentally disabled woman to be sterilized following the abortion of her pregnancy which was the result of a rape that occurred in her group home.  Is this the beginning of a modern revival of eugenics?

2002    In September, over 200 disabled activists march 144 miles from the Liberty Bell in Pennsylvania to Capitol Hill in Washington, DC to demand passage of the Medicaid Community-based Attendants Services and Supports Act (MICASSA) and “no more stolen lives.”   


2003   
A small group of survivors throughout the country, including David Oaks, Vince Boehm, Krista Erickson, David Gonzalez, Roma       Sayama, and Mickey Weinberg, gathered in Pasadena, CA, to start what became a 22-day hunger strike to press for human rights and choice in psychiatry. They demanded that the mental health industry provide evidence for its common claim that “mental illness is biologically-based.” No corroborating evidence was ever produced.

2003    MindFreedom Ireland was founded.   

2003    Coming off Psychiatric Drugs: Successful Withdrawal from Neuroleptics, Antidepressants, Lithium, Carbamazepine and Tranquilizers. Author. Peter Lehmann (ed.).
       
2003    The American Psychiatric Association, American Psychiatric Nurses Association, American Hospital Association, National Association of Psychiatric Systems and the Children's Welfare League make policy statements and recommendations on reducing and eliminating restraint and seclusion.   

2003    SAMHSA holds, 'A National Call to the Elimination of Seclusion and Restraint".    
2003    The Access to Recovery initiative is established to enable individuals seeking drug and alcohol treatment with vouchers to pay for a range of appropriate community-based services.
       
2003    President George W. Bush's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health calls for the transformation of mental health care in the U.S. to one focused on recovery.

2003    The Access to Recovery initiative is established to enable individuals seeking drug and alcohol treatment with vouchers to pay for a range of appropriate community-based services.   

2003    SAMHSA funds 8 three-year incentive grants to create alternatives to Seclusion and Restraint.

2003    Shifting: The Double Lives of Black Women in America. New York: Harper Collins Publishers. Jones, Charise and Kumea Shorter-Gooden.   
       
2003    The Institute for Wellness and Recovery Initiatives formed to provide peer delivered wellness and recovery training and education to assist in  mental health system transformation in New Jersey.
   
2003    Dan Fisher is appointed to the Freedom Commission.   

2003    President George W. Bush's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health releases report and calls for the transformation of mental health care in the U.S. to one focused on recovery including that the system be consumer and family driven.   

2003    SAMHSA holds national "Call to Action" event on Seclusion/Restraint in Washington, DC.

2003    In May a Florida judge orders a developmentally disabled woman to be sterilized following the abortion of her pregnancy which was the result of a rape that occurred in her group home.  Is this the beginning of a modern revival of eugenics?   

2003    Report released by The President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health.
   
2003    Friendly Spike Theatre Band who has been taking part all along, along with Parkdale Community Legal Services and Parkdale Activity Recreation centre, puts a Mad Pride into its season, brings in ongoing sponsorship and administration, begins working with City of Toronto to proclaim Mad Pride as an official City of Toronto Day.   

2003    US Supreme Court strikes down as unconstitutional state sodomy laws in the 13 states that still criminalized consensual, adult homosexual behavior.   

2003    Quincy Boykin (1944-2003) His story provides a rare glimpse into the trauma created by a crushed and compromised revolution for black liberation and wide-scale societal transformation.   
       
2003    David Hilton (1953-2003)5, the first director of an Office of Consumer Affairs in New Hampshire, dies in Spokane, Washington.   

2003    New Freedom Commission on Mental Health's Recommendations for transforming the mental health system including that the system be consumer and family driven.   

2003    Opened serious and sustained Media Campaign on going in Ireland.   

2004    An effort by advocates including Larry Roberts, & Carole Hayes-Collier, working with OMH Recipient Affairs, was successful in getting OMH to overturn the oppressive recommendations of a task force on restraint & seclusion, and replace it with a policy with the goal of eliminating restraint & seclusion.   Earlier work on this was also done by Howie the Harp.

2004    "Lost Cases, Recovered Lives: Suitcases from a State Hospital Attic," seen by over half a million visitors. Exhibit at the NYS museum curated by Darby Penney & Peter Stastny.   

2004    President George W. Bush plans to screen whole US population for mental illness.   

2004    INTAR, the International Network of Treatment Alternatives for Recovery, is an international summit of world renowned psychiatrists, people who have experienced psychiatric treatment, family members, psychologists, and other mental health professionals who meet annually to counter the belief that people with diagnoses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder can never completely recover.

2004    Bush plans to screen whole US population for mental illness.   

2004    SAMHSA/CMHS National Consensus Statement on Mental Health Recovery states that mental health recovery is a journey of healing and transformation enabling a person with a mental health problem to live a meaningful life in the community of his or her choice while striving to achieve his or her full potential.    

2004    American Psychological Association issues positions statement in support of marriage equality.
   
2004    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directed manufacturers of all antidepressant drugs to revise the labeling for their products to include a boxed warning and expanded warning statements that alert health care providers to an increased risk of suicidality (suicidal thinking and behavior) in children and adolescents being treated with these agents, and to include additional information about the results of pediatric studies.

2004    ”Consumer-Directed Transformation to a Recovery-Based Mental Health System”. Delivered at the Consumer Initiatives Summit Conference in March.

2004    ”Consumer-Directed Transformation to a Recovery-Based Mental Health System”. Delivered at the Consumer Initiatives Summit Conference, March, 2004.  Fisher, D. and Chamberlin, J.

2004 Infusing recovery based principles into mental health services, a white paper by people who are NYS consumers, survivors, patients and ex-patients.

2004    Alternatives in Denver, Colorado sponsored by the Clearinghouse.  Theme: Achieving the Promise of Recovery: New Freedom, New Power, New Hope
       
 Hope on a Rope by John F. McCarthy. Ireland.

2005    Talking back to psychiatry: The consumer/survivor/ex-patient movement. New York: Routledge. Morrison, L.   

2005    APA issues a position statement in support of same sex civil marriage.

2005    Janssen, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, markets Risperdal (risperidone), an antipsychotic drug that grossed $2.3 billion in US sales in 2005.

2005    Roadmap to Seclusion and Restraint Free Mental Health Services. DHHS Pub. No. (SMA) 05-4055. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.   

2005    The World Health Organization announced they are dedicating International Human Rights Day, 10 December 2005 to all people diagnosed with mental disorders "and the all-too-prevalent violations of their basic human rights."

2005    Wall St. Journal, United Press International, WebMD and Time Magazine Pacific all cover the story that researchers have debunked the "chemical imbalance" claim of psychiatric drug manufacturers.   

2005    Talking back to psychiatry: The consumer/survivor/ex-patient movement. New York: Routledge. Morrison, L.

2005    Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI) released a 2005 report about human rights abuses in Turkey, including electroshock of children. MDRI is a sponsor group of MindFreedom International.
       
2005    American Psychiatric Association President Admits the Psychiatric Profession is Dominated by the "Bio-Bio-Bio" Pill Model.  APA President warns "Big Pharma's" huge "kickbacks and bribes" hurt credibility.   

2005    Mother Jones exposes psychiatric drug screening.

2005    Letters: The evolution of the survivor movement. Psychiatric Services, 57,1212-1216. Oaks, D. et al.
   
2005    Depression an Emotion not a Disease.  by Dr Michael Corry and Dr. Aine Tubridy.
       
2005    Official name change of all Support Coalition activities under one umbrella name of MindFreedom International.     
2005    Separate and unequal: the legacy of racially segregated hospitals.  Monograph.  Vanessa Jackson.   
   
2005    Joseph Rogers, a movement leader, receives the Heinz Award for the Human Condition, a prestigious award administered by the Heinz Family Philanthropies, which is accompanied by an unrestricted $250,000 cash prize.   

2005    Alternatives in Phoenix, Arizona sponsored by the National Empowerment Center Leading the Transformation to Recovery: And Still We Rise.   

2005    RTE Dairy of a Madman.  Ireland.   
   
2006    US launches federal center on 'trauma informed' care.  The US government announces a new national center on care from a trauma perspective.

2006    The vote to establish a national memorial being built at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C. is made.   

2006    Pfizer Inc (PFE.NYS), the world’s largest drugmaker, Thursday said in a regulatory filing that its outgoing CEO, Hank McKinnell, would receive nearly $198 million in total compensation.   

2006    New Mexico's Senate adjourned without passing an involuntary outpatient commitment law.   

2006    England's Rufus May comes to Toronto and urges Psychiatric Survivors to present a Bed Push during Mad Pride.

2006    "Can You Dig It?" A participatory action research project on The Opal is coordinated in New York State.   

2006    The took my depression and then medicated me into madness: co-constructed narratives of SSRI-Induced Suicidality. Journal of Radical Psychology. by Rachel Liebert and Nicola Gavey.

2006    An article reveals that the American Psychiatric Association is launching a curriculum in USA schools to promote their perspective on the mental health system, which tends to promote psychiatric drugging. Funders of the APA's campaign are mainly drug companies giving more than $400,000 in total.   

2006    “They will find us and infect our bodies” The views of adolescent inpatients taking psychiatric medication. Journal of Radical Psychology. by Brenda A. LeFrancois.   

2006    Who fancies to have a revolution here? The Opal Revisited (1851-1860). Journal of Radical Psychology. by Lauren Tenney.   

2006    Alternatives in Portland, Oregon is sponsored by CONTAC.  Theme: Blazing the Trail to Recovery through Transformation.

2006    Psychiatric Survivor Testimonials and Embodiment: Emotional Challenges to Medical Knowledge. Journal of Radical Psychology. by Christopher Canning.   

2006    Nineteen social work academics have signed an open letter protesting the way the National Asociation of Social Workers (NASW) has entered into a financial relationship with the huge psychiatric drug manufacturer Jannsen.   

2006    National Coalition of Mental Health Consumer/Survivor Organizations founded.   

2006    The twenty-first century's first human rights treaty was adopted by the United Nations a year ago and opened for ratification on March 30, 2007.   


2006    Alaska Supreme Court Strikes Down Forced Psychiatric Drugging Procedures.
   
2006    Anna Schuleit, A New York City-based artist who works on transforming abandoned psychiatric institutions into memorials with art (such as Northampton State Hospital in Massachusetts) won a MacArthur "Genius Award" of $500,000.

2006    Bastille Day 25th Annual Demonstration, Vigil & Celebration in New York State led by the Alliance changed procedural issues concerning forced ECT with a 8 day fast.   
   

2006, Formation of the National Coalition of Mental Health Consumer/survivor Organizations, consisting of statewide consumer-run groups and the consumer-run National TA Centers. As of 2008, consists of 31 statewide groups and 4 TACs.


2006    U.S. FDA approves Risperdal for "irritability" in autistic children as young as 5 years old.   

Mother Jones September 2007 six-page article "School of Shock" by Jennifer Gonnerman.    2006-01-01 00:00:00 -0500       

2006    A matter of definition: Acknowledging Consumer/Survivor Experiences through Narrative. Journal of Radical Psychology.  by Linda Morrison.   

2006    On 23 November 2006 The New York Times ran a major article questioning the way young people in the USA are frequently prescribed a "chemical cocktail" of prescribed psychiatric drugs.   
       
2006    James P. Chasse, Jr. was a resident of Portland, Oregon, USA diagnosed schizophrenic who died in police custody. Psychiatric survivors and mental health consumers marched from the Alternatives 2006 conference to a memorial on 27 October 2006.   

2006    BBC News: Professors say psychiatric use of the term "schizophrenia" ought to be abolished because it's unscientific.   

2006    The Electroshock Quotationary by Leonard Roy Frank    .

2006    Soul Survivor: A Personal  Encounter with Psychiatry. by Mary and Jim Maddock.   
   
2006    MindFreedom Radio Show has supported a nonviolent revolution in the mental health system.   

2006    Peer Specialist Alliance of America.

2006    Launch of Hearing Voices, Cork, Ireland.   

2006    Alternative Sli Eile ( another way) became a reality in Charleville, Cork, Ireland.   

2007    A group of shareholders of Eli Lilly are seeking to sue officers and directors of the corporation for illegal fraud regarding their psychiatric drug Zyprexa.

2007    On 15 August 207, the huge USA federal funding agency Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has issued a long-awaited guideline about their funding of peer support mental health services.   

2007    The Zyprexa Papers Scandal.
       
2007    On the CBS television show "60 Minutes" on 30 September 2007, Katie Couric looks into the death of four-year-old Rebecca Riley who was given multiple psychiatric drugs after being diagnosed "bipolar." The parents were charged with murder.

2007    Washington D.C.;s 'icon' lesbian activist and archivist Cheryl Ann Spector died. She was 49.   
   
2007    The Depression and Bipolar Alliance grant to become National Technical Assistance Center.   
       
2007    International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology conference. International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology (ICSPP) is a key network of dissident mental health professionals and allies who are willing to challenge abuse in the mental health system and promote alternatives.    

2007    The Crazy Bed-Push from July 13, 2007, to Bristol.   

2007    BBC reports that UK House of Lords may make it far easier to coerce people living in their own homes who have not broken any laws to take psychiatric drugs against their will.   

2007    A new alliance called the "Opal Network" is beginning in Lane County, Oregon to support the voice, empowerment and self-determination of mental health consumers and psychiatric survivors.    

2007    MindFreedom affiliate in Maine began.   

2007    MindFreedom Youth Campaign begins.   

2007    A nonviolent protest using banners and guerilla theater was held in and outside of the "First Eastern European Psychiatric Congress" in Thessaloniki, Greece on 21 September 2007. The protest was by the Pan-Hellenic Coalition for Psychiatric Reform.    
2007    Celebrate World Hearing Voices Day and 20 years of achievement, 14th September 2007.   
   
2007    MindFreedom International presents a conference retreat supporting the growth of workable alternatives to the mental health system entitled "Creative Revolution in Healing: Turning Our Minds Around."    
   
2007    Terence McLaughlin, editor of Asylum magazine, dies. (1947-2007).   

2007    A fight to be.  A psychologist’s experience from both sides of the locked door.  Ronald Bassman.   

2007    Oregon groups of mental health consumers and psychiatric survivors have created a steering committee for a state-wide alliance called "Oregon Consumer Suvivor Coalition" (OCSC).   
   
2007    National Public Radio's show "Justice Talking" featured discussions with representatives of 'both sides of the story' about the issue of involuntary psychiatric drugging of people out in their own neighborhoods and homes using court orders. The show aired the week of 20 August 2007.   
       
2007    2 July 2007 update: Simone D. has had more then 200 forced electroshocks. The State of New York went to court to give even more. Simone D.'s attorney, Dennis Feld, fought valiantly. But the courts agreed to order even more forced electroshock. Electroshock is also known as electroconvulsive therapy or ECT.   

2007    MindFreedom South Africa launched a new project in the summer of 2007, at the founding meeting of the Maitland Ubuntu Centre for Treatment: Alternatives in Mental Health and PsychRights Advocacy.        
2007    Soundtimes Support Services Mad Pride Organizing group joins the effort and through their effort comes Mad Pride Toronto Bed Push Parade.

2007    The TV newsmagazine 60 Minutes exposed the torture and killing of a man with mental and emotional problems inside prison through hour upon hour of agonizing restraint.   
   
2007    Disability rights advocates marked December 3, 2007 - International Disabled Persons Day - by launching RatifyNow, a global campaign based in the U.S. to maximize the number of nations that ratify the new Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.    

2007    November 20 is the Day of Rememberence for Transgender communities as they gather across the country to commemorate those who have lost their lives to hate-motivated violence and neglect.

2007    Alternatives in St. Louis, Missouri sponsored by the Clearinghouse
Spanning the Recovery Movement: Consumer Control and Choice.   

2007    NAPS, the National Association of Peer Specialists. They held their first conference in Denver.   

2007    SAMHSA renews grants to create alternatives to Seclusion and Restraint.   

2007    CMS's Final Rule concerning patients' rights goes into effect.   

2007    The 2007 Thomas J. Dodd Prize hfor International Justice and Human Rights has been given to Mental Disability Rights International, a sponsor group of MindFreedom International.    

2007    The August 15 letter from CMS naming peer support as an evidenced based practice and providing states with guidelines to create a workforce of trained peers who can bill Medicaid for peer support services to help transform mental health to strength-based recovery.   

2007    In Toronto, Canada, 29 September 2007 is celebrated as Psychiatric Survivor Pride Day by the Mad Pride Toronto Organizing Committee.   

2007    The Recovery Learning Communities (RLCs) were started, funded by the state, in Massachusetts.   

2007    The American Psychological Association vote against a ban of psychologists from helping interrogators at Guantanamo Bay and other U.S. military detention centers. Instead, the Association voted for a milder resolution that banned about a dozen interrogation techniques. Dissident psychologists protested the vote.   
2007    Mother's Day Protests of Electroshock in Ireland, Toronto and Montreal.
2007    BonkersFest 2007 on 2 June 2007 was a wonderful success. There was a celebration of music, creativity, poetry, and strangeness! Mad Pride UK was one of the sponsors.    

2007    Freedom Center's Bed Push and "Escape from Psychiatry" to celebrate Mad Pride! July.   

2007    Not to be tabled: STOP forced “mental health” treatment.  Women’s Studies Quarterly, The Feminist Press. by Lauren Tenney   

2007    Representatives from National Consumer/Survivor groups from 7 countries (England, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, US, Australia, and New Zealand) that formed an international coalition called Interrelate.   

2007    Launch of report on 'The Adverse effects of Pharmaceuticals'. Ireland.
       
2007    The first Electro Shock public protest in Cork, Ireland.   

2007    Launch The Full Shilling in Ireland.   

2007    First Madman stands on Mental Health in General Election in Ireland.
       
2008    Mad Pride Day July 14 - Bastille Day - becomes Mad Pride Week July 14 - 20.   
   
2008    Mayview State Hospital in Pennsylvania to close December 2008.

2008    Green Body and Mind Declares Santa Cruz a Psychiatric Drug-Free 
Zone.   

2008    Branches of Ireland's Full Shilling established in Kampala and Mbola Uganda.

2008    Mindfreedom Uganda established.   

2008    The first Implementation Manual for the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities addressed specifically to users and survivors of psychiatry.
       
2008    SAMHSA/CMHS National Wellness Summit.   

2008    The Managed Care Consortium (MCC) formed in 1955 to create educational opportunities for a host of advocacy organization across the United States.  The MCC, with funding from CMHS, encouraged teams to form in each state to impact the development of managed care programs.   

2008    Nearly half of psychiatric hospital beds are closed 1999-2000   
2008    CPSNJ developed the Economic Development Program under Community Enterprises Corporation (formerly Butterfly Property Management) to provide economic development opportunities to low-income people with special needs, in order to decrease reliance on public assistance and enable them to progress towards economic self-sufficiency.   
   
2008    Agents in My Brain: How I Survived Manic Depression. by Bill Hannon.
   
2008    The Lives They Left Behind. Darby Penney and Peter Stastny (Bellevue Literary Press).
   
2008    Public television's "Frontline" is airing a show Tuesday, 8 January 2008, on the psychiatric drugging of USA children, particularly with the super-powerful "antipsychotic" or neuroleptic drugs.   
       
2008    UK's Guardian newspaper covers the news that a major study says SSRI antidepressant psychiatric drugs are no better than placebo.   

2008    "Alternatives Beyond Psychiatry" co-edited by Peter Lehmann and Peter Stastny.   
   
2008    Bonkersfest is a wonderful annual Mad Pride event in UK that brings thousands of people together for creativity, music, costumes, strangeness and even a bit of education about human rights of people in the mental health system!

2008    UilenSpiegel from Belgium celebrates its 10th Anniversary. Seminar "Patient Rights en Patient Representation mental health care" on the 4th of October.

2008    Alternatives 2008 in Buffalo, New York.   

2008    Youth Power! in New York State releases their Policy Agenda.